Worst Hard Time Analysis

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Throughout history, minority groups have experienced countless oppressive acts. Minority group oppression has led to a lack of culture preservation. Racial strife in Arc of Justice; forced assimilation in Bury My Heart at wounded Knee; the fight between the genders in Mays Homeward Bound; authoritarian governments and their subjects in With The Old Breed, and the victimization of poor people in the Worst Hard Time each share the theme of oppression. People in positions of power enact oppression. Oppressors refuse to assimilate the issues of a minority group. Targets of oppression survive by repressing feelings of torment, and by creating a euphoric subculture within their respective communities. The wounds of oppression heal slowly and are …show more content…
The ability to preserve their culture under the pressure of assimilation from the dominant culture was nearly impossible. However, this can be survived by the safeguarding of personality. This is essential in that is requires a group of people to have more than only a mutual history, additionally "basic organizations and practices. Some of the oppression upon the Indian people began with the Dawes Allotment Act of 1887, this act allowed the President to survey and divide Indian tribal lands and distribute property to individual Indians, totally negating previous Indian tradition. “Kill the Indian, save the man.” The Dawes Act was essentially designed to promote Indian assimilation into White society. “Excess” land would be bought and opened up for white settlers. The new policy adopted at this time was based on the belief that traditional Native American culture had no value. Indian tribes are either constrained into the general public of the overwhelming society or their way of life is insignificantly spoken to through specific foundations, which are regularly the same establishments that disappoint them. In occurrences where they were managed that chance to epitomize who they are as an individuals, for case Native Americans, they were so financially shut out of society that their subculture endured more prominent damages than advantages. The forced …show more content…
Consequently women were like prisoners in the home and only frequented social gatherings while men could afford other luxuries that included having mistresses and this created a division in nuclear family set up. Consequently, women were oppressed by the domestic expectations placed upon them by society, "consumerism and children [became] the rewards that made the marriage worthwhile," rewards that many Cold War families flocked to in search of a deeper meaning. (May, 180). For many women there was no place for this discontentment with domesticity that was promoted by the GI bill to be voiced. They seemed to have let go of the female independence that was acquired during World War

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