Minjung Movement Analysis

1847 Words 8 Pages
Protests and uprisings are quite familiar in many democratized countries. It is the ability of the people of that country to express their disapproval and make their voices heard on certain topics. For example, in the state of Wisconsin there were protests for several days when the governor cut funding and removed unions under his Act 10 law. Even though this caused thousands of people flocking to the capital of Wisconsin it is nothing compared to the protests of South Korea in and around the 1960 elections that would later be named the Minjung movement. At the point of the 1960 election the freedom and democracy of South Korea was at stake. Thankfully, due to South Korea’s strong protest culture and the unification of the Minjung movement …show more content…
Students began to, “develop a long-term perspective in anticipation of a longer authoritarian regime under Park” (Lee 217). The students knew that they couldn’t do it alone if they wanted to oust Park from his high chair and recapture their democratic government. “They articulated that social change and democracy might involve broader structural changes rather than just political reform. They perceived a need to organize various sectors of society, particularly labor” (Lee 217). This organization of student, intellectuals and the labors classes united and became known as the intellectual-worker alliance. There was no longer a division because of social class, everybody wanted the same thing and that was their basic human rights back. All this movement needed was something to rally around and ignite their motivation. They found it in an unfortunate death of Chon T’aeil. Chon set himself on fire in a busy market and began shouting, “we workers are human beings, too!” “Do not let my death be in vain,” and “guarantee the Three Basic Labor Rights” (Lee 218). People all around South Korea recognized the courageous act, causing their souls to stir and eventually casting them into the streets and factories knowing that they needed to fight back against the authoritarian government promptly (Lee 218). This unification …show more content…
The people of North Korea share many similarities to the people to their south. They were both molded from relatively the same culture, but something happened during the division of the country. While the people of the south were fighting for human rights and democracy, the people of the north were unified under a Juche ideology. Juche is a word that means to put the state over oneself. This means for the people of North Korea that everything and anything they do should be for the advancement of their country and not for their own needs and desires. This would mean working long days, receiving little compensation, and struggling to meet their basic necessities of life, because their government told them that it would push their country forward together. These people were satisfied with giving up their human rights if it meant they were following the orders of their leader. The people of North Korea didn’t fight back against the unjust that was being casted down upon them by their authoritarian leader, instead, they either stayed and obliged, or they fled the country in search of a better life. Green conducted interviews for his paper The Daily NK, which interviewed individuals who had recently fled North Korea. The quality of life is so bad in North Korea that there isn’t

Related Documents