Millennials In Joel Stein's The ME Me ME Generation

1251 Words 6 Pages
Joel Stein, the author of “The ME ME ME Generation”, argues Millennials are a generation of narcissistic brats who are addicted to technology. Every day, Millennials upload thousands of new selfies on their social media accounts. They scroll endlessly, liking their friends’ posts of their vacation, sharing a photo of themselves with a new trendy Starbucks drink, or taking selfies along with writing an inspirational quote. We live in a world where Millennials are extremely self-absorbed; however, Stein fails to account that Millennials are cautious of their actions due to the widespread use of information on the internet that could affect personal and professional relationships. The current behaviors of the narcissistic Millennial generation …show more content…
By having parents show affection to their children, this allows them to feel appreciated and cared for without having the need to feel “special”. Also, if Millennials understand the difference between self-esteem and self-worth, they will not feel the need to rely on instant gratification from their peers. Throughout my life, my parents raised me to work hard in sports, school, and anything I wanted to achieve. For example, when I was about five years old, I participated in ballet. After one of my performances, there were trophies available for purchase. I asked my parents if they would buy me a trophy and they responded to me that “Trophies are not bought; they are earned. We are still very proud of you and love you”. This correlates to Stein’s quote: “The problem is that when people try to boost self-esteem, they accidentally boost narcissism instead. "Just tell your kids you love them. It's a better message," says Jean Twenge, a psychology professor at the University of San Diego, who wrote Generation Me and The Narcissism Epidemic (28). Parents are the foundation for a child’s moral character and success in …show more content…
Back in Elementary school, I knew some of my classmates whose parents provided them their own phone to communicate with their family members. My parents believed that kids at a young age should not have cell phones until they reach high school because they wanted me and my sister to learn how to speak to people personally. However, Technology does allow for faster communication, but the constant interaction through a screen hinders growth for personal relationships with Millennials and their peers. Because texting is a structured way of writing the perfect story or idea, there is a lack of human interaction, which causes Millennials to be afraid of talking to someone else face-to-face and making mistakes. “Millennials are interacting all day but almost entirely through a screen. You've seen them at bars, sitting next to one another and texting. They might look calm, but they're deeply anxious about missing out on something better. Seventy percent of them check their phones every hour, and many experience phantom pocket-vibration syndrome” (Stein 29). Millennials are so caught up trying to show others that they are living the perfect life, ultimately causing them to feel left out if they do not take part in what everyone else is doing. Instagram is a perfect example of “living the perfect life” because no one wants to show their flaws. Everything is through a hand-picked quote or

Related Documents