Mill And Voltaire Similarities

Improved Essays
How are these documents similar? All of these documents share links, connecting the rights of all humans to their countries. It has been agreed upon that all humans receive these rights by the United Nations, and other countries have taken these rights and expanded on them. Between all of the different documents a common thread of fundamental freedoms, that everyone has these freedoms to express to express their opinions and cultures. No one can stop you from demonstrate ng your religions or from speaking ones opinion. These freedoms to can not be removed by anyone, much the right to have rights. Every person is allowed to have rights that apply to all circumstances to all citizens. As the united declaration states “everyone is entitles to …show more content…
The idea of giving people fundamental freedoms to allow the expression of religion and speech came from Mill and Voltaire, who both believed that people were free to do as they wished as long as they did not infringe upon the rights of others. As Voltaire states, “I may not agree with what you say, but I will fight o the death for your right to say it.” This demonstrates his desire to have everyone be allowed to live how they with. These citizens should be allowed to say what they want and do what they want without to restrictions of the government. Mill is often described as an individualist, wishing to focus on the freedoms of the individuals to exercise their rights. He believes that all people are equal and deserve rights. Mill was also on of the big equal rights activists of his time, claiming that everyone should be treated equally, especially women, regardless of how different they seem. Race and gender of someone should not dictate how they are treated in society and in the eyes of the law. The universal declaration of the rights of man agrees with this statement, affirming the rights of the individual and their access to the fundamental freedoms that everyone else holds. Montesquieu was the main leader in the system of government that many countries still hold today, with separated branches, but also was an advocator for the democratic vote. He believed that all citizens should work together to create a government that supports the members of its society and works towards their common interests. This democratic vote idea is now a fundamental section of the declaration of rights and freedoms in the United States, inspiring them to separate from the tyranny rule of Great Britain’s

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    This does include the freedom of religion, and each and every other basic human right is protected and promised under international law. In Jack Donnelly’s, The Source of Human Rights, Donnelly argues that human rights are given by the people for the people, under human morales. Donnelly includes in his argument “The list of rights in the international Bill of Human Rights can be seen as resting on a morale vision of human nature that views humans beings as equal and autonomous individuals who are entitled to equal concern and respect”(Donnelly 25). I will also use this quote. Autonomous individuals who are entitled to equal concern and respect is seen as a Democracy.…

    • 1215 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    All citizens have the same rights regardless of gender, religion, or color. Ideas from the Enlightenment such as “humanism” and “individualism” also appear in the Declaration. The idea of humanism states that every man is important. There is no one man that is better than the other. Individualism gives rights to the people, such as freedom to express themselves in speech or…

    • 1060 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The common goal of all people is freedom as everyone wishes to be able to achieve what they want without the government telling them it is not right. With the evolution of human rights, it has been made clear that humans should be as equal as possible and society will function to its greatest ability when the humans live freely. This means that the government intervenes when necessary because of offensive or harmful acts (Rohlf 2016). In positive liberty, the government is there to tell you exactly what to do to not break the law, therefore remaining “free”. Clearly, freedom is a topic of great relevance to our society that has been interpreted through many different lenses.…

    • 1090 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    All Americans have the same fundamental rights. Everyone must obey the laws, regardless of race, creed, religion, gender, or sexual orientation, and in return, everyone enjoys the same…

    • 954 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    When running a society and trying to solve the problem of passionate men there needs to be a way to ensure that everyone is acting accordingly. With this Hobbes formed his idea of having a social contract. Citizens would sign a contract giving their rights to a Leviathan. As long as what they did, did not interfere with what the Leviathan viewed as dimmable then they had their freedom. Hobbes defended this idea was saying that it was in a signed social contract and the people have given their consent because of this he also believed that the scope of this rule was unlimited.…

    • 1326 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I believe that human rights are universal rights. Human rights are universal because we are all the same as humans. When it comes to human rights we should be treated equally all around the world. There are some countries and regimes in the world that do not care for others and for their rights as a person. When this happens there needs to be people that come together to stop them.…

    • 2510 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights begins by recognising that the inherent dignity of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world’. The Declaration includes civil and political rights, like the right to life, liberty, free speech and privacy. It also includes economic, social and cultural rights, like the right to social security, health and education. Adding to the rights stated in the Cyrus Cylinder, it helped to establish the rights that each and every human are entitled to. Article one, and the most important one in the Declaration states that “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.” This is the basis and concrete definition of human rights.…

    • 1348 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Overstepping some boundaries to ensure the peace within the nation, is acceptable as there has to be some great, ruling power. Naturally, every person has liberty over their conscience and if someone was to limit or deprive them of that, they are considered to be exhorting their power. So, if the magistrate is willing to pass some legislation, they need to consider whether the new law will not infringe people's right to judge. However, Locke also believed that as ecclesiastical rules deal with ceremonial practice, they are unlikely to limit people's…

    • 1166 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They both advocated for individual freedom and expression. Mill backed self-progression over group-progression, not to harm fellow citizens, but to uphold the idea of individual freedom. Mill thought as long as it was not at the cost of a fellow citizen, then the individual’s interests may surpass the interests of the whole, in search of individual liberty. Mill wanted citizens to support society as a whole similar to Tocqueville, however Mill thought individualism was more important than the greater good. Tocqueville thought the greater good should be upheld alongside, or before individualism.…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Mill’s work goes into depth on how much liberty should be granted to the individual and to what extent the government should be able to intervene with these liberties for the betterment of society. I agree with Mill on what the basic tenets for his argument on freedom of speech are (i.e. truth, utility, social progress). I also accept that the justification of freedom of speech as that which can bring about such things as truth and social progress. He provides a clear explanation for society as to why it is important to allow others to state their opinions and not infringe upon the free speech of others.…

    • 2454 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Great Essays