Military Revolution In The Late Middle Ages

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Introduction
The period between the late Middle Ages and the Early Modern is a significant transition time in Europe. In 1955, Michael Roberts, who is a famous British historian, raised the concept of military revolution in his report ‘The Military Revolution, 1560-1660’. Since then, there was a study upsurge of the military revolution in academia. Many historians believe in military technological determinism that during the late Middle Ages, the so-called ‘gunpowder revolution’ led a dramatic change of battlefields in Europe, and it has a profound influence on the European social history. As far as I am concerned, the military revolution is a gradual process rather than an abrupt change; it is the fundamental and radical transformation of

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