Military Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

1506 Words 6 Pages
research proposes to integrate the disciplines of History and Psychology to examine military Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The history of the shifting diagnoses and treatments of military veterans with PTSD can be applied to civilians as well. Different forms of PTSD have changed over time from the Civil War to the present war in Iraq. An in-depth analysis of various treatments shows that modern day treatments have evolved over time. The treatments are better equipped to cure military veterans as well as athletes that may be suffering from gruesome injuries. In order the sections will introduce what PTSD is, the history of shifting diagnosis from the Civil War through the Vietnam War, PTSD becoming a classified disorder before the …show more content…
Symptoms of PTSD do not show up right away. Therefore, a psychiatrist may wait up to six months to test the patient. PTSD can develop from any traumatic event. A traumatic event consists of someone seeing, hearing, or being the individual exposed to a tragic event. Being exposed to military combat, terrorist attacks, abuse, and assault can affect the mind of the patient. Throughout traumatic events, a person 's life may be in jeopardy and afterward, they feel like they cannot control the situation around them. There are many ways to develop PTSD. If traumatic events from the past keep reoccurring in the mind, there may be a chance of having PTSD. The possibilities of having PTSD differ according to the particular traumatic event. Most symptoms of PTSD are seen right after or months after a traumatic event depending on the patient. Even though most psychiatrists tend to wait on testing a soldier returning from deployment because sometimes the symptoms do not show up right away. Detecting PTSD in veterans gives them a better chance to get early treatment, which reduces long-term …show more content…
In Loughran’s article, Shell Shock, Trauma, and the First World War: The Making of a Diagnosis and Its Histories, Loughran gives great insight about PTSD incidents that happened during the war. Some soldiers came out of the trenches stuttering, trembling or even blind. First documented during WWI, soldiers had nightmares when they accidently killed a comrade. Those situations could have an effect on the physical, physiological, and psychological parts of troops. Throughout most of WWI, a majority of the warfare used shells or missiles. The psychiatrist believed that shell shock was a literal shocking to the brain in the frontal lobe (Rae, 2007). PTSD was not a recognized disorder during those times, many of the soldiers

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