Chinook Research Paper

Great Essays
Over the last few decades, populations of Chinook – or King – Salmon have dropped to all time lows in Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula. Three years ago the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADFG) significantly tightened their restrictions on King Salmon fishing in general and particularly a type of fishing called setnetting (where fishermen employ large nets to catch massive quantities of fish). Since then the King Salmon numbers have been slowly rising to 24,000 fish last season and projections for this year hover around 30,000 Kings expected. The article from the Alaska Journal of Commerce entitled “Larger Expected King Run Loosens Restrictions on Setnets, Drifters” reports that due to these recently optimistic projections, the ADFG will allow …show more content…
Its acclaim was derived from the extreme natural abundance of the halibut and four species of salmon that live there. Each summer, Sockeye, Coho, Chum and Chinook salmon migrate upstream by the millions to reproduce. A similar migration cycle of sport fishing tourism each year travels to the Kenai peninsula, bringing in millions of dollars to the local economy. Each fisherman arrives to the beautiful area with the hopes of landing a King. In native Inuit culture the Chinook Salmon has always been the King of the many rivers that penetrate Alaska’s large land mass – earning its nickname. Renowned for their immense size, difficulty to catch, and delicious meat, it has always been clear that this species is supreme. However, over the last twenty five years, for reasons largely unknown, the King Salmon has seen its return dwindle to all time lows of which reached an all time low of 16,871 fish in 2014 (ADFG). That year was the second that major restrictions on setnetting had been in place. As recently as 1990, Kenai King runs had exceeded these numbers by a factor of more than …show more content…
In the summer of 2014, I worked as a salmon fishing guide on the Yukon and Tanana rivers in the interior of the state. That summer in the Alaska Department of Fish and Game closed the Yukon River for King Salmon fishing for the entire summer. I was able to see for myself the harm that this type of change did to the community; both the native and non-native denizens of the area saw businesses struggle, and cultural impediments with this change. One that jumps out as significant was at the annual Nuchalawoyya celebration. Typically this three-day native festival is full of fresh King Salmon being traditionally cooked to serve to the several villagers in attendance. In 2014 there were only six salmon, which were frozen from the previous season in light of the local fishing ban. This temporary hold on all salmon fishing was difficult, but taken well as it is necessary to rebuild the fishery. Mayor Jon Korta of Galena (a small village on the Yukon) described local fishermen already voluntarily cutting back on the number of Kings each season in an effort to protect one of the state’s most valuable resources (Mowry et al). This fact that such drastic action was necessary, and the local response to it on the Yukon should be an example for the ADFG when handling similar problems on the Kenai Penisula. It further proves that King salmon fishing

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Around eighty five percent of wild salmon stocks are overfished or depleted(Gaia Vince, how the world 's oceans could be running out of fish). Land based fisheries have proved mostly unprofitable for farmers because of the time the salmon take to fully mature and because salmon are genetically predisposed to stop growing colder months. The aquadvantage salmon grow year around due to their genetic modifications. This makes land based aquaculture profitable. Land based fisheries enjoy many advantages over traditional net based fisheries, such as a reduced risk of escape and they can go anywhere on land with no restriction like water temperature or water…

    • 1298 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Hatchery-reared salmon and wild-reared salmon breeding together results in genetic outbreeding depression. Outbreeding depression occurs when the offspring exhibit lower reproductive success and chances of survival than their parents in the local environment. Wild salmon populations have developed traits over generations that allows them to adapt and thrive in their natural habitats. When populations of wild salmon and hatchery-reared salmon are crossed together their offspring may possess traits that may be detrimental to their survival in the same habitat. Hatchery raised male salmon only have 51% of the reproductive success that wild salmon exhibit. (Neff et al, 2015) Hatchery raised salmon exhibit reproductive behaviors that differ widely from wild salmon that result in hatchery males fertilizing 62% as many eggs as wild males (Neff et al, 2015.) Although this could mean less reproductive competition for wild male salmon, that trait could spread throughout hybrid salmon populations and lead to a reduction in salmon populations due to the high reproductive failure…

    • 1034 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The river restoration project created to restore the San Joaquin river to its former glory, therefore It should help the salmon instead of the farmers as Daniel Weintraub explains in his article River Restoration Project Offers a Sprinkling of Hope I agree with Weintraub I believe that the river restoration project should continue for the salmon because the environment has a greater significance than some farmers losing their jobs farmers. I agree with Weintraub because he’s very credible he has been working for the Sacramento bee for fifteen years and has twenty-two years in politics. Weintraub’s article published by the Sacramento bee most of the readers includes middle and upper-class people and as for Sacramento it is the capital city of…

    • 1270 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Decent Essays

    All tastiness aside, the discrepancy in funding for protecting different species in the case of Chinook salmon and steelhead makes perfect sense. Salmon is the lifeblood of the pacific northwest. It feeds the forests, wildlife, communities, and the economy. It is no surprise that nearly 80% of funding was devoted to these two species. Populations of Chinook salmon and steelhead have declined rapidly since the 1980s and it appears despite our best efforts they are continuing to decline.…

    • 512 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The theories range from global climate change patterns to too many people dipping their setnets into the rivers. However, what we do know – conclusively – is that this problem is very real, and each day nothing is changed the problem persists, continuing to eat away at vibrant culture and economy. As biologists and researchers pry open the doors behind which the solution hides, the fishermen and small business owners of the several Alaskan communities that depend on this fish await with baited breath. Hoping to find that there is an answer, hoping that they will see the salmon return to color the Copper River red once more, hoping that all is not…

    • 1345 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Namu, located in the traditional territory of the Heiltsuk Nation on the central coast of British Columbia is an archaeological obscurity, as no one can be sure of the actual time frame of intensive storage and sedimentation occurrences. On the Northwest Coast "salmon remains, the representation of cranial elements versus vertebrae, mass capture technology and storage structures are being debated as evidence for large-scale salmon storage" (Cannon and Yang, 2006). The use of this knowledge is to acquire sustainable information of when the sedentism and storage actually began.…

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Looking at lake Mille Lacs again, we see the economy in the area dramatically drop since the announcement of a one fish limit. Because of Mille Lacs residing in central Minnesota, Anglers cannot justify a long drive to only take a single fish home each day. However, increasing the limit allows local business to thrive with an influx of anglers spending at gas stations, bait shops, and guide services. We also see an increase in the overall fishing industry with extensive purchases of tackle and licenses, as well as hotels and resorts. In the end, an increase in the economy of the fishing industry allows the DNR to continue supporting and stocking Minnesota’s lakes for many generations to…

    • 703 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Kurlansky effectively weaves facts that let readers intuitively felt how the COD gradually became extinct, driven by human greed. The cod fish had played a significant role in the economics, policies, diplomacy, and development of many countries and societies. Therefore, the conflict of fishing territories and rights always accompanied with cod fishing. Kurlansky also traces these hostilities through short history tales that are easily absorbed and understood. The most interesting thing is in the book's final section,"A Cook's Tale: Six Centuries of Cod Recipes”. Kurlansky describes detailed recipes of cod from the days of the Vikings until the 1900s. This part not only provides detailed examples for the large demand of COD in the past but also lets the reader enjoy visual…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Pollock is one type of fish that is domestic.Did you ever know that pollock fish in alaska have a limited thermal tolerance range? The older they get the lower the tolerance range will go.The females have been recorded of laying at least 1,000,000…

    • 1449 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The founders of Trout Unlimited (TU) shared an appreciation for Michigan’s quiet streams of trout and made it their mission to “conserve, protect, and restore North America’s coldwater fisheries and their watersheds” for future generations to come (Trout Unlimited…

    • 714 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Spread the word and plant a tree. If you live in area that might have a salmon outreach program, join. The Internet also has many resources of organizations that you can donate to. There are many things you can do at home such as planting native trees along side the river to allow the cool shade that are needed for salmon to survive. Also, the trees stop erosion and provide more food for the fish. Ask others to help and make them more aware of the subject…

    • 747 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Fishing is important in Alaska since the Bering Sea and North Pacific salmon, cod, pollock and crab are obtained. Alaska fishing offers the most jobs, and ranks second in revenue after oil. Besides being the main staple in many homes, several areas of Alaska. Fishing in Alaska, for 1990, he went through one of the worst moments, when the shortage of fish began. Hundreds of fishermen were traveling each year for the fishing season, as it was a very lucrative for each business. There was times that each fisherman earning between three hundred and five hundred dollars a day, which was good for anglers. After about three months sacrificing fishing, they come home with enough money. In the past five years, Chinook salmon from Alaska began to disappear…

    • 1023 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Alaskan Salmon Analysis

    • 794 Words
    • 4 Pages

    If I were to create a nature documentary, I would focus on the lifecycle and human-related difficulties of Alaskan salmon. This is because they are something I already have a fundamental understanding of due to my experience as both a recreational and commercial fisherman in Alaska. The documentary would be intended as an educational piece aimed at stimulating awareness and interest in salmon while also subtly advocating for greater protective measures on Alaska’s natural salmon runs. As such, the targeted audience for my documentary would be individuals in my community and across the state of Alaska who are uninformed and/or do not have any opinion about the effects of human-related activities on the wild Alaskan salmon population.…

    • 794 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The weather can be harsh to your home, and it can be particularly hard on your roof. Storms and snow can cause immense damage to your roof that can leave you a victim of damage. To avoid headaches and to save money, Chinook Roofing in Anchorage, Alaska, wants to make sure that you’re prepared to check your roofing after every storm and to call the experts if and when you need roof repair. The earlier you catch any issues such as leaks, wood rot, or other damage, the more affordable the repair.…

    • 389 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    While the hatchery does raise thousands of young fish, many of them don’t survive long enough to reproduce and the complex steps that go into their reproduction is disrupted by faulty human practices. Firstly, fish like salmon are artificially fertilized and fed food treated with antibiotics and chemicals that negatively affect the fish. Since the fish are kept in small, confined spaces, the fish become less intelligent because they live in a simplified environment. Because there is a lack of diversity in their environment, there is a negative psychological effect on the fish that makes them less likely to survive in the completely different environment of the wild. Also, since they do not live in streams, fish like salmon are unable to live with a specific scent that will guide them back home to reproduce. Even though fish hatcheries can try to restore the salmon fish population, they cannot do so with their current methods. Fish hatcheries currently feed fish by tossing food on the surface of the water where the fish go to eat it. After some time of learning that food is at the surface, young fish will be transported to rivers hungry and will go to the surface to find food. However, this causes at least 97% of young fish to be eaten by birds before they even make it to the ocean. By continuing to feed salmon and other fish in this detrimental…

    • 1037 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics