Michelangelo Buonarroti Analysis

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“Studies for the Libyan Sibyl” (1510–11) by Michelangelo Buonarroti is the study of male anatomy and is a characteristic example of Michelangelo 's late draughtsmanship, and a preparatory sketch for one of the female seers frescoed Libyan figures Sibyl, painted on the Sistine Chapel Ceiling (1508-1512) Rome, Vaticana Palace. Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, Caprese 1475–1564 Rome) was a painter, sculptor, architect, poet, engineer as well as a compulsive drawer, of the High Italian Renaissance era, who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art. Michelangelo was once quoted saying “Design, which by another name is called drawing is the font and body of painting and sculpture and architecture and every other …show more content…
Michelangelo was obsessed with the human form and understanding the shape of the human figure above all else and known for his pieces physical realism (Michelangelo And The Mastery Of Drawing). “This drawing is the result of intense observation and masterful economy of notation, from which the artist would pull information for painting the fresco” (linesandcolors.com). Michelangelo was an individual artist who worked on projects in various disciplines. “One of the commonalities that relate each of his works in the different fields together is that they all start with a drawing” (michelangelo-gallery.com). One way we can observe the critical thinking process Michelangelo used is in the toe being drawn three times. His attention to detail and desire to have the finished Libyan Sibyl portray how the body would move anatomically as realistic as possible while bearing the body 's entire weight. Small notations next to the details he wanted to either further study or knew would change how the final Libyan Sibyl’s clothing would lay. The number three can next to the rib cage; this represents the three rib bones. Small circles and faint lines are placed next to areas of muscle definition, in these regions he also used white chalk to show dimensions and details. The facial features of the larger head shown in the lower left of the recto seem closer them …show more content…
Michelangelo was fiercely protective of the sketches and jealously guarded his drawings he produced in preparation for his works. Michelangelo was said to be intensely paranoid that others would try to discover the secret of his genius, but he may simply have been paranoid that his endlessly inventive and very personal works would be plagiarized by unscrupulous competitors. To be protective of where his sketches ended up, he sent many of them home to his family. He also protected his work by burning quantities of drawings in the course of his seven decades as an active artist, towards the end of his life, his nephew, Leonardo reported that his uncle had destroyed everything in two bonfires

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