Abrahamic Covenant Research Paper

Superior Essays
Zachary Reese
Prof. Patrick Emmett
RS 110
2/10/16
Forms of the Covenant Judaism is a religion with rich history and strong Jewish cultural followings. Many of which are recorded in the Hebrew bible. In Michael Molloy’s book, Experiencing the World’s Religions, he defines covenant as “a contract,” but more specifically as a contract “between the Hebrews and their God, Yahwheh” (340). The beliefs in Judaism hold firmly on one God, and they circle the covenant made between God and the Jewish people. The importance of the covenant is made clear in the rituals, symbols, history, and cultural observance of this intimate relationship between God and the Jewish people. The obedience to God’s covenant in Judaism is demonstrated through the ritual and
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The Abrahamic covenant explained in the Hebrew bible is one of great importance in Judaism. Abraham is known as “the first Hebrew patriarch” (Molloy 299). In this covenant Abraham was told by God to leave his home and go to a land that would be shown to him. Here he would be used to make a “great nation”. God enters this contract with Abraham and in return for providing him with land, security, and descendants he tells Abraham that they must be circumcised (Gen 12:1-2). This is to signify the covenantal relationship. In, Sabbath, Circumcision, and Tithing, written by Michael Morrison, he explains that this covenant requires “Every male to be circumcised, the foreskin at the tip of the male sex organ was to be removed, and this was to be the sign of the covenant with God, and it was everlasting”. This ritual is called the brit milah, which means “covenant of circumcision,” or may also be known as a bris. Morrison also explains that in this ritual “every baby boy was to be circumcised on the eighth day of his life” (15). Circumcision became an important tradition and characteristic that reflected the covenantal relationship between God, Abraham, and his …show more content…
It is known as the “sacred core” of the Hebrew bible. It is here that the religion’s rituals and daily behavior is governed by the laws included in its scripture (Molloy 293). It includes all of the significant covenants that God has made, and gives guidance to God’s chosen people. Year round the Torah is read, and it culminates in a celebration known as Sukkot. This festival described by Molloy “ends the cycle of Torah readings that began the year before”. This is the eighth day of Sukkot and it is known as “Simhat Torah” or the “Day of rejoicing in the Torah”. During this celebration the men will dance, and march with the Torah. They will even kiss it to show their appreciation to its teachings (327). This signifies the importance of their covenant with God, and that adherence to these readings is their part of fulfilling this

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