Mexico Political Identity

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Mexico is a nation found in North America, sharing a northern border with the United States and a southern one with Belize and Guatemala. To the west lies the Pacific Ocean and to the east is the Gulf of Mexico. The country is part of the Northern and Western Hemispheres. As a federal republic, it is also officially known as the United Mexican States much like the United States of America. As a one of the largest nations in the world, Mexico is almost three times the size of Texas; its area measures about 1,943,950 square kilometers. The country has various types of terrain, including high mountains from east to west, many kilometers of desert, to the plateau that makes up the center of the country, and lastly, low coastal plains. …show more content…
However, the identity of Mexicans tends to lie in the ethnic roots, whether they were mainly European or indigenous. Artists such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo depicted pride in their native ancestry and the present cultural importance of the arts. The political organization of Mexico is such that it has a plurality of political parties and to obtain the presidency, it has become almost impossible to obtain more than half of the vote. PRI is the largest political party in Mexico with respect to numbers, which in English translates as the Institutional Revolutionary Party that was created in 1929 to combat the failure of the Mexican government to uphold the agreements made in the Mexican Revolution during the previous century. Much of the constitution of Mexico takes inspiration from the American constitution, as in seen in the three branches of government, two houses of congress, and similar powers of the president. Thirty-one states and one federal district make up …show more content…
The importance of Roman Catholicism is featured throughout the country, adorned with magnificent churches. In areas with large indigenous populations, native spirits are celebrated alongside the Catholic saints. Even as the Spanish brought a monotheistic religion to the Americas, this provided an interesting take on the religion; “Dia de los Muertos” is an important holiday in Mexico that worships a saint of death. The Spanish influence of Roman Catholicism in Mexico is such that three fourths of the country practices the religion. The next group only represents about five percent of the country, which is Protestant Christianity. This group includes the one of the largest group of Jehovah’s Witnesses in the world, although it only comprises one percent of the

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