Meursaut: A Simply Careless Character In The Stranger By Albert Camus

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Meursaut: A simply careless character There are two types of completely opposite characters that can be represented throughout a novel; static and dynamic characters. All characters in a story fall within this range. A static character is simply described as someone who does not undergo an important change in the course of a story. Throughout a compelling story, the character would remain the same even though they may experience life changes. The static characters do not experience a change of confidence, persona, or morals. The second type of character possible is a dynamic character. Dynamic characters go through an important inner change, as well as possibly a major life transition, experience, or develop and mature throughout the range of the novel. Static and dynamic characters do not depend on the changes that happen to the character, but instead, it depends on the changes that happen within the character. In a novel by Albert Camus, “The Stranger”, Meursaut is the main …show more content…
Meursaut takes the news better than anyone should. He appears to think that he deserves this harsh penalty, but still reveals no sign of guilt. He demonstrates the fact that simply does not care whether he dies or lives. A policeman asks him if he was nervous, and Meursaut replies with a short, “No.” (83). Meursaut finally depicts a slight emotion and that would be depression. His words depict depression when he says, “Everybody knows life isn’t worth living… it doesn’t much matter whether you die at thirty or seventy.” (114). When this static character finally conveyed a small amount of emotion, it was only sadness because he realized his own life was over, still not worried about the other life he has taken, the Arabs. The last chapter in this novel may suggest the fact that he has emotion, but there is absolutely no change to his character; no pity, just simply his discomfort and jitters about his own

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