Metropolis Film Analysis

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The general premise of the film Metropolis relies on the duality and segregation that causes tension within the film. The duality of the films animation style can suggest a metaphorical description of the separated society. This brewing tension within the story stems from reactionary circumstances due to causations of tyrannical government, militant and radical forces within the segregated city of Metropolis. Although there is an obvious wealth and power imbalance that separates the city from above and below the ground, the ghettoized area of underground Metropolis seems to be the section of the city brimming with life. Even so, this area of the city consists of marginalized human and artificial life subjugated by the selfish political endeavours …show more content…
She appears innocent at first, but her purpose was to be a machine used for mass control and destruction. An innocuous girl, barefoot with a toy radio in hand that not too long ago learnt to speak, would be capable of a near apocalyptic event to render the human species extinct. The “human” side of Tima allows her to love Kenichi and yearn for him; however, sentient needs are not an intended part of Tima’s makeup resulting in the disintegration of her emotions and feelings towards Kenichi in her attempts to kill him. The destruction of her artificial human psyche causes her to go insane and on a destructive path. The question on whether she is a revolutionist or a savior to the ongoing war between humans versus robots or the rich versus the poor leaves a level of ambiguity, as Kenichi serves as a redeemer. Nevertheless, there is a sort of tension that separates Tima from being a savior and a guerrilla. Perhaps, in some way Tima can be seen as a savior even through the destructive outcome and near apocalypse. The light that seeps through the building and shines on Tima seems like a beacon to the people below in the square as they identify the young girl as an angel. However, the poster of Ché Guevara leads to think there is association between Tima and the Latin American guerilla …show more content…
A good example of the unequal distribution of power displays in the mise-en-scene. The bright warm colours of Zone 1 compared to the cooler pastels of “ground zero” exhibits the opposing forces and segregation of the two parts of Metropolis. This different palette of colours discerns the two parts of the city with having different cultures. On closer inspection to the vibrancy and liveliness of the lower level, one notices the fading and derelict aesthetics due to poverty. The organic materials such as metal, concrete and wood form this shanty town hidden from the sights of visitors who would ever visit Metropolis. By separating and ostracizing the impoverished areas cloaks the ugly truth of the vast amounts of poverty. The above world differs in terms of culture through elitism that focuses on attaining capital and power. Yet, the underground world demands to consume, whether in an attempt to make money or through commercials and advertisements that forces them

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