Merton's Anomie Theory

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Some of the aspects from these three articles can advance the understanding and the validity of Merton’s anomie theory. When looking at the study done by Baumer and Gustafson, the quality of their study is very sound. The researches find a way to measure the different parts of Merton’s theory, such as legitimate employment and other things that would be considered blocked opportunity and crime, and measure them (Baumer & Gustafson, 2007). Baumer and Gustafson also give solid background information and details about their approach on how they carry out their study and previous studies done before them. Such as giving information on previous studies done on the topic and having charts to show how they measure different things in their study (Baumer …show more content…
The findings from these studies all were somewhat consistent with Merton’s anomie theory, or parts of his theory. Although Baumer and Gustafson’s findings were not consistent with their exact predictions that were elaborated, their findings were on par with other explications of Merton’s theory and “do affirm some of Merton’s comments about the conditional ink between crime and adverse economic conditions” (2007, p.647). Despite not being the researchers initial predictions, the study still provides Merton’s notion that crime is more likely to occur in poverty. Which, it is possible for this study to retested where it could prove that crime in these areas is due to blocked opportunity to legitimate means to obtain cultural goals. Schaible and Altheimer’s findings are consistent with Merton’s notion that imbalance in social and cultural structure need not necessarily result in higher homicide rates, but only tends to do so when there is an imbalance in which either means are deemphasized or materialism excessive (2015, p.951). This finding, along with the validity of the research, gives more support to Merton’s anomie theory. This is due to finding that homicides seemed to occur only when there is an imbalance between the emphases on cultural goals and not one of the legitimate means to achieve these goals. This finding validates Merton’s theory that societies that put high emphasis on materialism items, but not legitimate means to achieve them experience more crime. In the study done be Chamlin and Sanders stays neutral in either supporting or refuting Merton’s anomie theory. The findings of their study miss out on measuring anomie, therefore they cannot really prove anything solidly on this theory (Chamlin & Sanders, 2013). Due to the findings of two our of three of the articles, and the validity within them, it can be concluded that there is ample amount of support for Merton’s anomie

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