Mercantilism In Colonial America

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Economically, America was a clear trading system for importing and exporting. Since England did not find the golden success that the Spanish did down South, they had to settle on the natural resources of America. These resources such as timber and tobacco were essential to England’s own economy. Instead of having to buy these materials from other countries they were able to find them in colonial America. In 1650, Britain takes measures to ensure that mercantilism would boost their own economy instead of others. Restrictions were placed on the colonies trade to secure that exporting would be more frequent than importing. The materials that were transported to England were then made into goods that were sold all over Europe. This income transformed …show more content…
Connecticut was known for its surplus of dairy and grain. New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania were the “bread colonies”. The Chesapeake Bay area had the very important crop of tobacco which was much needed by England. Southern colonies developed rice and indigo that has significant value in the system. Out of all of these colonies the middle and southern colonies were the special ones. Northern colonies had resources that England did not need. This made things very difficult on the North as they were importing more in than exporting out. Their credit was not good with English merchants unlike the productive South. The whole trading system was meant to enrich the motherland by transporting and consuming. Although this imperial relationship between England and America does not serve the whole for colonists, there were other benefits. With being a part of the English empire, colonists were given defense. This saved the colonies millions with Britain taking the expense. Also, the mother land paid bounties to encourage the production of these rare materials. Before 1763, there was only one law that caused friction between this set …show more content…
With England closing an eye to trading, many colonists were able to smuggle foreign goods in. It was much cheaper than going the proper way through English imports and illegal. Until the French and Indian War, economically things flourish by being self sufficient. This war changes the attitude that America and England had with each other. During the salutary neglect, colonists did as they pleased without bothering Britain. The same happened while the French and Indian War occurred, but these issues soon arose. Americans were still trading with the French advanced the war longer than needed. This angered many people over in England who were footing the bill for this conquest. To keep the Americans in stricter lines, parliament enacted the writs of assistance. The law of writs of assistance gave England the right to search private property for smuggles goods. Colonists fought back with James Otis as their lawyer saying it was “against the fundamental principles of law” (Unger, 2010, p. 78). Other than wartime commerce with the enemy there was the expense of war

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