Essay On Mental Illness

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Mental illness has existed since ancient times, but most individuals at the time, including medical professionals, believed it was caused by demonic possession or angering the gods. Over time, there this view was debated and various treatments for mental disorders developed. Treatments such as herbal remedies, the “rest cure,” anti-psychotic drugs, and therapy were used and many psychiatric hospitals were established. The “rest cure” was criticized by female writers as it required patients to give complete control to their physicians. Major developments in mental illness treatments have occurred in the past centuries, improving the quality of care patients receive.
Around 400 B.C.E., the physician Hippocrates began to treat mental illnesses
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government to create state hospitals for mentally ill individuals (“Timeline: Treatments for Mental Illness”). According to “Mental Health,” asylums were built in rural areas with access to physical activity, education, and “religious instruction.” These hospitals stressed the importance of healthy, clean living rather than providing drugs. The belief in moral treatment began to decline after a failure to produce results and old beliefs returned. People also began to blame heredity and bad habits, such as alcoholism and masturbation, and there was an increase in the use of sedatives (“Mental …show more content…
From herbal tonics and anti-psychotic medication to therapy and isolation, many techniques were attempted to determine a way to cure mental illness. Recent advances in medicine have significantly decreased the advancement of such illnesses, but there is still much to be done. The drugs prescribed to patients, such as anti-anxiety medications and antidepressants, often cause many side effects ranging from drowsiness and anxiety to heart problems and suicidal thoughts. In order to effectively treat mental disorders, advances must be made to ensure safer medication and greater involvement by the physician. A combination of medicine, therapy, and support, along with a healthy lifestyle, will ensure greater improvement for individuals with mental

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