Fifty Shades Of Grey Gender Analysis

Based on the small sample above, it is easy to see how women and men are unequal in the media. Overall, women are judged based on their physical attractiveness, and men are judged based on their intellectual and physical competency (Crawford, 66). These gender biases have a huge impact on our culture, especially during the gender schema development process. Once children have constructed a schema, it is difficult to alter it. Unfortunately, most schemas are based off of stereotypes, which are arguably more difficult to change. In order to actually change how society treats men and women, we must start with understanding our preconceptions about them. The first example, face-ism, is dangerous because it is subtle. Personally, I had never heard …show more content…
I was aghast at the Gucci ad (image 3, above) that showed a lanky woman lying across a man’s lap and his hand caressing her backside. It troubles me that a high-end clothing line can get away with sexually exploiting the female body for the sake of sales. Unfortunately, Gucci is not the only offender, and clothing ads are not the only victim. Fifty Shades of Grey is a prime example of a man asserting unhealthy dominance over a woman. Although it was a box office hit, the film ignited feminist protest because it communicated a very troubling message that dangerous, unhealthy relationships are acceptable. Women of all ages were exposed to the glorification of a dysfunctional, dominating relationship. This mindset wreaks havoc on the healthy development of relationships because mainstream media like advertisements and film entertainment capitalize on the idea that it is sexy for a woman to be forced into …show more content…
They begin to loathe their own body because it doesn’t match up with our culture’s ideal. On top of that, images are typically accompanied by advertisements reminding women that “attractiveness is central to femininity” (Crawford, 69). In the textbook, there are multiple accounts of studies that link body image with self-esteem, and the results show an overwhelmingly negative relationship (Crawford, 69). Poor body image not only dampens self-esteem, but it also perpetuates the idea that women need affirmation from men in order to feel beautiful. It is a slippery slope, to be sure. Once women feel like they need male approval, it is very possible for them to exhibit extremely dependent behaviors. In my experience, I know beautiful women that go through a vicious cycle of relationships for this reason. First they feel like they are unworthy, then they find a boyfriend who is controlling, but because he affirms her physical appeal, she finds herself doing anything to please him. The result is an unhealthy, unbalanced relationship. I think the basis for most of these cases is the unrealistic standards for women and the sexual objectification of the female

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