Men And Women And Gender Equality In Society

1793 Words 8 Pages
Throughout the pre-modern and early-modern time periods, both men and women fought for what they thought was right. Gender equality was one of the major issues then, and to a certain extent, is still an issue today. Men and women have always been looked at as if they are not equals. All over the world, it is believed that, besides the physical features, women and men possess fundamentally different roles in society. Understanding this helps you to understand the male/female difference in regard to the position within the family, types of work, and legal rights. Let us take a look at how women and men have evolved over time. The following documents will be used to support my argument. They include; Life in a Peruvian Convent By: Ursula de Jesus, …show more content…
Industrialists and manufacturers were known to follow the tradition of dividing the work among the genders; however, they now divide the work at random. In some factory towns the men were the weavers and the women performed some of the processes that it took to finish the woven cloth. But then again in other towns, women worked on the looms and then men only repaired and upheld the machines. It was said, that even though the women’s work was identical to the men’s, it required less skill and always received less pay. Men would always dread when women would be brought to the factories simply because it could have meant that the owner intended on saving wages which meant that the men’s jobs would be getting cut. …show more content…
All the way from Italy and Germany to the United States, women have joined the fight to create and preserve strong nation states. Women were exposed to the laws and taxes, but they were denied the rights of citizenship, which included the right to vote, to own their own property, and to participate in public life . For countries as far apart as Japan and France, the government made it a crime for women to partake in political meetings and they would be arrested and imprisoned if they were to participate. Rape, other forms of physical abuse, inequality of wages, and sometimes they would not get any wages at all, were all seen as a “normal” way to treat/punish the women . In an article written by Bonnie G. Smith, she wrote about how women’s activism produced some major changes. Women in Chile and other Latin American countries had successfully promoted the vote. Catholic feminists won the right to divorce, to be able to access to birth control information, and to have the legal right to abortions. The request for the protection from rape, incest, and bettering became the main focus of thousands of women’s groups from the 1970’s to the present

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