Pros And Cons Of Mein Kampf

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I find many of the beliefs expressed in Mein Kampf to be rather disturbing. Somehow, through some pseudoscience, Hitler came to believe that people could be measured by their race, by their blood, and that the German people were the best; the highest form of humans. The arrogance apparent in this belief alone boggles my mind, never mind the entitlement present in his belief that this inherent “superiority” entitled the German people to more land. It is bad enough to view one people as ethnically superior (a sad truth throughout much of history), but to feel the need to cleanse the world of the so-called “lesser” people is absolutely sickening. I was surprised when Hitler used North America, the United States, as an example to prove his point. After reading his reasoning I simply wanted to scoff, as he was blatantly …show more content…
In the excerpt from the Truman Doctrine, President Truman speaks of Greece as a nation utterly destroyed by the war and the population suffering greatly in result. He speaks of chaos and political violence. I do not doubt the validity of these claims, however, the anti-communist message is clear. The United States’ aid to Greece was not simply a humanitarian act, but an attempt to curb the perceived threat of communism. I am glad the United States sent aid to struggling nations, but I am not so sure how I feel about the effort to more or less destroy communism. It is true that communism has yet to work in practice, but, at the time, that was not truly known. The United States interfered in the affairs of foreign nations during the cold war for fear of communism, leading at times to regretful actions (the Vietnam War and Bay of Pigs Invasion for example). “I believe that it must be the policy of the United States to support free peoples who are resisting attempted subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressures”.(Truman Doctrine

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