Henrietta Lacks Research Papers

Superior Essays
The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks
Rebecca Skloot, Award-Winning Science Writer
Harland Howell II
11/16/2017
Northeast Mississippi Community College
Dr. Tabatha Perrigo (Psychology)

Abstract

Overall, medicinal research made an intriguing breakthrough over than 50 years ago by obtaining tissue samples and cells from a patient that changed the medical world drastically. Cancer of course was and still is an occurring issue today in society but prior to the past, there was more of an epidemic due to the unawareness and lack of medical research in the early 20th century. Other illnesses, likewise, such as polio was an embarking widespread dilemma in the early 20th century. However, scientists and doctors were lead to a promising and effective
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Who is that person? That person is known as Henrietta Lacks who was an African- American female who is deemed as HeLa among the medical community. By most, she is referred as being the most important female in medical history and is commended for being the reason for the modernization and revolution of modern medicine. With, in this paper, I will gain feedback from well-acclaimed author Rebecca Skloot who embarked on a journey to shed light on the story of Henrietta Lacks and uncover the mysteries behind African-American experimentation which the Lacks family knew nothing about her "immortality”. Also, I will draw additional references and research pertaining to Henrietta Lacks and her significance.

Henrietta Lacks’ Backstory (Who Is She?) Henrietta Lacks obviously is prominently known from the formation of the HeLa cell line which I've said before but I'm going to dive into giving a synopsis of Henrietta's early life and give an insight of how she became so renowned and why she was so unique.
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There’s no doubt that the cells that were discovered in Henrietta were extraordinary and have been a major medical discovery, however we cannot ignore the lack of doctor’s getting consent for the discovery which ultimately became and was a haunting issue of the Lack’s family in knowing secrets and experimentation of Henrietta. In conclusion,
I hope I gave vast insight of the legacy of Henrietta Lacks and her significance to why she is dubbed as the most important female in medicine and science.
References

Five Reasons Henrietta Lacks is the Most Important Woman in Medical History. (2010, February 05). Retrieved November 16, 2017, from https://www.popsci.com/science/article/2010-01/five-reasons-henrietta-lacks-most-important-woman-medical-history

Zielinski, S. (2010, January 22). Henrietta Lacks' 'Immortal' Cells. Retrieved November 16, 2017, from https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/henrietta-lacks-immortal-cells-6421299/

Zielinski, S. (2010, January 22). Henrietta Lacks' 'Immortal' Cells. Retrieved November 16, 2017, from

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