Medea As A Feminist Analysis

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The Rise of Feminism in Medea Feminism is the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is well known that women have always struggled for equality, especially in ancient Greece. They served merely as child bearers and housewives, doing whatever their husbands asked of them. The play Medea by Euripides specifically shows how patriarchal and misogynistic society was during that time period. Not many men cared about women, much less advocated for them. Euripides uses Medea to show the rise of feminism among women in Greek society. Euripides paints Medea as a strong independent woman who can solve her own problems. She feels abused and used by Jason, but instead of accepting it, she asserts her own power. She is …show more content…
She is aware of the inequality between men and women. For example, she goes to speak to the women of Corinth complaining, “First of all, we have to buy a husband: spend vast amounts of money, just to get a master for our body-to add insult to injury” (534: 233-235). One could view this as an early feminine revolt. Like actual women during that time, Medea was aware that society viewed her as weak and wanted change. One could compare the history of women’s rights to Medea and her changing from weak to strong. Women began as merely child bearers, weak and unable to do anything but what their husbands wanted. As Medea stated, “Of all the living creatures with a soul and mind, we women are the most pathetic” (534: 231-232). Just as Medea fought for herself and her rights, it is necessary for women today to do the same. There is a case that has gotten a lot of attention lately in which a British actress turns down a role on Broadway because she is being offered less than half of what her male costar is getting paid. Even though women are not viewed as “property” anymore, issues such as the pay gap exist between men and women. Men get paid significantly more than women and the only way it will change is if women continue to stand up for themselves, just as the actress and Medea have

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