Measles Virus Essay

Great Essays
In 2000, the measles virus was considered eradicated, until an outbreak in late 2014 that has many at risk. There are over 644 cases of infected patients, many of them being young children. Even though people think they are safe from diseases and illnesses, measles is highly contagious and vaccinations are an absolute must. Many have died and even more have been infected or even just affected by sick or lost family members. The virus has been around for quite a long time. In the 1930s the most contagious illness was discovered, the measles virus. In 1954 John F. Enders experimented with the measles virus and began looking for a vaccination. He then began an immunization program soon after. In 1912, the virus became a bigger problem in the U.S.. There were around 6,000 deaths each year, 48,000 people alone were hospitalized, and another 4,000 people contracted encephalitis in result of having the measles virus (Iannelli). Encephalitis is inflammation of the brain, which is very deadly. Almost all children had been diagnosed with the measles virus before the age of 15 years old. Finally, in 1963, John Enders created the first measles virus vaccine. His vaccine was affective. Although, in 1968 Maurice Hilleman created a new, even stronger vaccine that has been used in the U.S. ever since. An outbreak in …show more content…
Health officials are actually blaming the recent spread of the virus on those that do not get vaccinated. These people are often referred to as “anti-vaxxers” (“The Measles Outbreak”). Patricia Smith expresses that, “Vaccination isn’t a private choice but a civic obligation.” Parents that do not vaccinate their children claim that they are worried that it will lead to autism, a serious disease, or later complications in the child’s life. Patricia Smith interviews a California mom who voices that “She doesn’t want so many toxins entering his body.” In 2013, the vaccination rate was 91 percent lower than

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    2014 saw the worst U.S. measles outbreak in two decades (Siegel, Marc). People are spreading the measles that have not been vaccinated, and they do not even know it. Some may think it is the flu, but the measles have some of the exact same symptoms. Although parents are more scared of the vaccination, they should be more scared of the measles. In consequence, parents against vaccinations have brought back the measles and have affected numerous states, especially…

    • 948 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    W. Bush and Ronald Reagan administrations weren’t as concerned with the vaccine funding as the last democratic president. Because of this the funding for vaccines decreased and the cost of vaccines increased. The results of this were declining rates in vaccinated children which assisted in the 1989 Measles outbreak. This outbreak infected 50,000, hospitalized 11,000 and killed 150 children. Following this was the Clinton administration which brought back good vaccination number from the Comprehensive Child Immunization Act of 1993.…

    • 919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Measlla Vaccination

    • 830 Words
    • 4 Pages

    High fevers, rashes, miserable coughs, a possibility of blindness or even death. Since the creation of the Measles/Mumps/Rubella vaccine in 1957, the number of cases a year has gone down from half a million to a handful, even though they are highly contagious (Shames). In today’s society, these viruses are so rare that many people cannot even list the dangers and symptoms. Although this is true of the general population, the preventative measure of vaccinations has been on a decline in Ashland, Oregon, and thus dangerous outbreaks are predicted to occur in the near term. A group of Ashland parents has created a dangerous environment by choosing to opt-out of vaccinating their children.…

    • 830 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Rhetorical Strategies in“8 Reasons Parents Don’t Vaccinate (And Why They Should)” by Tara Haelle Recently, more and more parents have grown skeptical of vaccinations, claiming they are dangerous and can cause an array of negative side effects. Author Tara Haelle wrote, “8 Reasons Parents Don’t Vaccinate (And Why They Should),” shortly after the 2015 measles outbreak in the United States, Mexico, and Canada, in order to address these popular concerns and eliminate them. Haelle cites a number of professional sources to add to her credibility, effectively providing her argument with factual evidence.…

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Vaccines

    • 1390 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Lastly, one in five hundred children will die from measles ("Complications of Measles"). This is not a very lethal disease, but it is nonetheless painful and difficult to control ("Complications of Measles"). The illness most commonly affects young people and the elderly, but the constant contact with others in younger years makes the disease spread rapidly through…

    • 1390 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Any vaccine-preventable disease can strike at any time in the U.S. because all of these diseases still circulate either in the U.S. or elsewhere in the world” (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2012). The society needs to revises its concepts about vaccination and taking it more seriously. Disease that have disappear long time ago from the community are more likely to appear if vaccinations are…

    • 1083 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Measles Vaccination Paper

    • 524 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Measles vaccination is the most effective way of preventing this disease. Though John Enders discovered the very first measles vaccination, using a killed virus wasn`t effective enough. In 1967, Maurice Hilleman advanced Enders` discovery by using a weakened live virus in the formula (“For Healthcare Professionals”, 2015). This attenuated vaccine is usually mixed with Mumps and Rubella to give protection against three kinds of viruses. Two doses of MMR are offered.…

    • 524 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This seems to be due to the spreading of anti-vaccination articles, celebrities taking an anti-vaccine standpoint, and many other reasons. Whooping cough rates have raised dramatically as a result of this, and some “virtually extinct” diseases could begin making reappearances. In 2008, we had the biggest outbreak of the Measles since 1997 with over 130 cases being reported by early December. Dr. Travis Stork predicts, “...if they don't vaccinate, we could have a measles outbreak, and it could become an epidemic where like years ago, 4 million people are getting the measles.” Barbara Loe Fisher disagreed with his statement, point out the 131 cases is not a epidemic, to which Stork replied with, ““It's not an epidemic, because children are being vaccinated.”…

    • 1478 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As the number of measles cases dramatically rises across the United States, so does the controversy surrounding measles vaccinations. The conflict between parents who refuse to vaccinate their children and parents who fully believe in the vaccination is being propagated by several bills, such as a new legislation in California requiring schoolchildren to get vaccinated unless there was a medical reason. But this new legislation raises another question: is the ability to refuse to give your child a vaccine an expression of class privilege? Instead of giving their children the vaccine, which would allow them to go back to school, some parents are simply having their child withdrawn from school and home-schooling them as an alternative.…

    • 592 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The vaccine became available in 1963. Measles in the United States, since 2000, has been considered eliminated since there were not any active cases for more than twelve months. The same is not true for international countries where measles is considered endemic(Center for Disease Control [CDC], Measles, 2015). A.Measles Outbreak A1. Outbreak Analysis…

    • 1090 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mandatory Vaccines

    • 1199 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In a recent survey of more than 1,500 parents, one quarter believed that vaccines can cause autism in healthy children, and more than one in 10 had refused at least one recommended vaccine.14 Doing this can not only effect the life of a child, but also that of a parent. If a child is exposed to a disease, the likelihood of an unvaccinated parent contracting the disease from an unvaccinated child is substantially higher than an unvaccinated parent contracting it from a vaccinated child. To prevent a mass plague among a community, parents should continue and start vaccinating their…

    • 1199 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Measles Research Paper

    • 1183 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Measles “Worldwide, about 20 million people each year get Measles” (For Parents: Vaccines for Your Children). This statistic shows that the measles infection affects many people worldwide each year. Measles is a highly contagious virus, that is most commonly found in children. Measles is a well known virus, that can have multiple symptoms associated with it. There is very little treatment options available that can be used.…

    • 1183 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Are vaccines more harmful or helpful? Do the benefits outweigh the risks? Is autism related to vaccinations? These are a few of the questions many people ask before getting vaccinated or allowing their children to be vaccinated. In this paper we will use scientific based evidence to explore the benefits, risks, and myths associated with vaccinations.…

    • 963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In this one case, there were at least 70 people who had contracted measles and out of these 70, 32 of the infected were unvaccinated, 1 was partly vaccinated and 7 were vaccinated (Xia). Dr. Gil Chavez stated, “We have had in two and a half weeks, as many cases as we had last year”. Measles is more contagious than polio, smallpox, or the flu. It can spread through the air and linger in a room long after an infected person has left, and most people who are infected with measles, don’t know they have it until they develop the characteristic red rash. Measles also has a 21 day incubation period, so an infected person can travel before they start showing symptoms (Fox).…

    • 1223 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “As of Aug. 29 about 1000 cases of measles have occurred in the U.S. in 2014: the largest outbreak in 20 yrs.—in a country that the Center for Disease Control and Prevention declared measles free in 2000” (Offit A1). This so happens to be a year prior to the published article by Dr. Wakefield in regards to the correlation between MMR vaccine and autism. Regrettably many parents were brainwashed into thinking that vaccines risk our lives, and chose to not have their babies vaccinated. Now we 're dealing with an even bigger problem, diseases that were once wiped out from vaccines are now making a comeback. Jo Craven McGinty explains that “According to the CDC, measles is so contagious that 90% of the people who are exposed will become infected if they aren’t immune” (McGinty A2).…

    • 1502 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays