Measles Virus Essay

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In 2000, the measles virus was considered eradicated, until an outbreak in late 2014 that has many at risk. There are over 644 cases of infected patients, many of them being young children. Even though people think they are safe from diseases and illnesses, measles is highly contagious and vaccinations are an absolute must. Many have died and even more have been infected or even just affected by sick or lost family members. The virus has been around for quite a long time. In the 1930s the most contagious illness was discovered, the measles virus. In 1954 John F. Enders experimented with the measles virus and began looking for a vaccination. He then began an immunization program soon after. In 1912, the virus became a bigger problem in the U.S.. There were around 6,000 deaths each year, 48,000 people alone were hospitalized, and another 4,000 people contracted encephalitis in result of having the measles virus (Iannelli). Encephalitis is inflammation of the brain, which is very deadly. Almost all children had been diagnosed with the measles virus before the age of 15 years old. Finally, in 1963, John Enders created the first measles virus vaccine. His vaccine was affective. Although, in 1968 Maurice Hilleman created a new, even stronger vaccine that has been used in the U.S. ever since. An outbreak in …show more content…
Health officials are actually blaming the recent spread of the virus on those that do not get vaccinated. These people are often referred to as “anti-vaxxers” (“The Measles Outbreak”). Patricia Smith expresses that, “Vaccination isn’t a private choice but a civic obligation.” Parents that do not vaccinate their children claim that they are worried that it will lead to autism, a serious disease, or later complications in the child’s life. Patricia Smith interviews a California mom who voices that “She doesn’t want so many toxins entering his body.” In 2013, the vaccination rate was 91 percent lower than

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