Massacre At Mystic Analysis

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Massacre at Mystic: On May 26th, 1687 a very one-sided battle between a group of Puritans from the Massachusetts Bay Colony and members of a large Pequot village called Fort Mystic took place late at night. In this battle, the Puritans set fire to the Pequot village, killing most of the people in the village, including tribe leaders, women and children. Led by Major John Mason and Captain John Underhill, a mix of Puritans, Mohegans and Narragansetts, attacked the Pequot village at around 2 a.m. killed Pequot warriors with swords and guns, and when the rest of the villagers would not leave their wigwams, Mason gave orders for his men to set the remaining Pequot building and citizens aflame. When the sun arose and the evidence of the carnage …show more content…
The Pequot people still retained land and continued to regain lad that was stolen them for years to come. With these new lands, they opened a casino on their reservation in July of 1983. This reservation ended up making the tribe over 1.3 billion dollars, making the Pequot people the richest Native American tribe. In essence, although Major Mason thought he had perpetrated the “utter destruction” of the Pequot people, he was wrong. Of course, he made the Pequot’s lives more difficult and murdered many of their people, but Pequot used the law and democratic retain their land and their culture. The murder at Mystic set into motion English dominance of the North American continent, but the resilient tribes of the time managed to survive through depression through many sacrifices and the smarts to work with the law they had oppressed them, instead of attempting to tear it …show more content…
These few small bits of gold eventually led one of the biggest economic influx in America. After Marshall and Sutter confirmed that the flakes were really gold. At first, they tried to keep the discovery under wraps, both because they didn’t want the word of gold on his property to get around and he didn’t technically own the land on which the gold was found. Inevitable the word of the gold did get around. A lot of people thought it was a joke or a rumor, but one of Sutter’s worker took a vial of gold to San Francisco as proof. After that, people made their way to Sutter’s land in California, driven by a lust for gold. Soldiers, farmers, and people from all walks of life came to Sutter’s land on the hope of making easy money. The gold rush began only amongst Californians, but in the summer of 1849, word reached other parts of the country and people from all over came to California for their shot at the big money. These quick “fortunes” made people spend recklessly, a “symptom” of the “gold rush disease” that the men mining for gold suffered from. The gold rush was the greatest mass movement of people in history, coming from not only all over America, but also from Canada, Mexico, and locations on various other

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