Civil Liberties During World War II

Improved Essays
Civil Liberties Denied
The civil liberties of Americans can be changed forever when the government turns a blind eye to our civil liberties during times of national tragedy. In February 1942 during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the mass incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese Americans. It is estimated that two-thirds were American citizens. In 2002, author Cherstin M. Lyon spoke with internment camp survivor Japanese American Joe Norikane. “He (Norikane) hoped historians and students might preserve the memory of his wartime stand for civil rights…” Even during times of national security, Americans must stand with our forefathers and the Constitution in defense of our civil liberties. When
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By 1940, the growth of Japanese involvement in California agriculture was impressive and many Californians were jealous of their economic success. So long before the attack on Pearl Harbor, labor unions and farmers wanted the Japanese out of California; the bombing of Pearl Harbor and World War II provided the opportunity. As the Japanese Americans rushed to comply with the executive order, most were forced to sell their homes and businesses for a mere fraction of their actual value to Caucasians farmers. It is an interesting fact that the Nisei (second generation) and Issei (first generation) living in Hawaii and making up a third of the population were not subjected to the same mass evacuation and internment. According to Gail Sakurai in her book Japanese American Internment, the reason was both cultural and economic:
"There was no mass relocation and internment in Hawaii, where the population was one-third Japanese American. It would have been impossible to transport that many people to the mainland, and the Hawaiian economy would have collapsed without Japanese American workers. "
Japanese labor was considered vital to the civilian and military economics of the Hawaiian Islands. It is also true that few Japanese living in the East or Midwestern portions of the U.S. were subjected to the mass
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Only What We Could Carry: The Japanese American Internment Experience. Berkeley, CA: Heyday, 2000. Print.
"Japanese-American Internment." ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, 2015. Web. 05 May 2015.
"Japanese Internment." United States American History. On Line Highways Civil Liberties Denied
The civil liberties of Americans can be changed forever when the government turns a blind eye to our civil liberties during times of national tragedy. In February 1942 during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the mass incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese Americans. It is estimated that two-thirds were American citizens. In 2002, author Cherstin M. Lyon spoke with internment camp survivor Japanese American Joe Norikane. “He (Norikane) hoped historians and students might preserve the memory of his wartime stand for civil rights…” Even during times of national security, Americans must stand with our forefathers and the Constitution in defense of our civil

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