Mass Incarceration Of The Civil Liberties Of America

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Civil Liberties Denied
The civil liberties of Americans can be changed forever when the government turns a blind eye to our civil liberties during times of national tragedy. In February 1942 during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the mass incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese Americans. It is estimated that two-thirds were American citizens. In 2002, author Cherstin M. Lyon spoke with internment camp survivor Japanese American Joe Norikane. “He (Norikane) hoped historians and students might preserve the memory of his wartime stand for civil rights…” Even during times of national security, Americans must stand with our forefathers and the Constitution in defense of our civil liberties. When
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Only What We Could Carry: The Japanese American Internment Experience. Berkeley, CA: Heyday, 2000. Print.
"Japanese-American Internment." ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, 2015. Web. 05 May 2015.
"Japanese Internment." United States American History. On Line Highways Civil Liberties Denied
The civil liberties of Americans can be changed forever when the government turns a blind eye to our civil liberties during times of national tragedy. In February 1942 during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the mass incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese Americans. It is estimated that two-thirds were American citizens. In 2002, author Cherstin M. Lyon spoke with internment camp survivor Japanese American Joe Norikane. “He (Norikane) hoped historians and students might preserve the memory of his wartime stand for civil rights…” Even during times of national security, Americans must stand with our forefathers and the Constitution in defense of our civil
…show more content…
Citing national security interests, the US government demanded that Japanese Americans be internment without due process. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066 in Hirabayashi v. United States and Korematsu v. United States.; Justice Hugo Black writing the majority that “rejected the plaintiff’s discrimination argument and upheld the government’s right to relocate citizens in the face of wartime emergency.”
With the 9/11 attacks, our government again targeted specific groups of people based only on their national and/or religious affiliation under the guise of national security. The USA Patriot Act, National Security Entry-Exit Registration System, and the Special Registration program targeted and disproportionately affected Muslims Americans along with Arabs and South Asians.
Just as the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II sparked constitutional and political debate the “virtual” internment of Muslim Americans after the 9/11 attacks is a dark mark on our nation 's respect for civil liberties and cultural

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