Continental Soldier: A Summary

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The American Revolutionary War is very much revered as a “man’s war”. The most recognizable figures from this era were mainly male, however there were several heroines involved in the story of how the United States came to be. Women were often overlooked as viable soldiers, their roles were mostly focused on the upkeep of the base. These jobs included being a laundry maid, waitress, and seamstress for the base residents that could afford it. These roles were neither glamorous nor glorious, and much like the female gender at the time, was looked down upon as unimportant. The careers that received high praise and recognition were the male positions in the regiment, the Continental soldiers. The job of a continental soldier was reserved …show more content…
Young’s book, Masquerade: The Life and Times of Deborah Sampson, Continental Soldier, little was known about Deborah Sampson and the life she lead. The idea that Deborah Sampson had accomplished the male soldier charade was well known, however there was little documentation that detailed further into this masked soldier. Herman Mann, a budding journalist and fictional author, is the author of the only novel documenting Deborah Sampson’s achievements in a hybrid writing style of fiction and reality. Alfred Young, a distinguished professor of history at Northern Illinois University and senior research fellow at the Newberry Library, explores the exaggerated detailing of the female soldier and begins to construct a realistic timeline of Ms.Sampson’s life. Using knowledge of the time period’s social views and customs, Young is able to sort through the fabrications and the truth that lies within Mann’s book and frame the true events that formed who Deborah Sampson …show more content…
After Deborah left the army, due to her discovery by the doctor who mended her wounds, she married a farmer named Benjamin Gannet. They lived a modest life with a small farm and their three children. The social interest in her life did not start until Herman Mann published his writing on her, his main subject. Once the public had grown aware of a woman who defied odds and served in the army, Mrs.Gannet was swept up in the hype that surrounded her. She began touring the north and giving lectures about her time spent in the infantry. During this time, Deborah lived a lavish life, indulging in luxurious fabrics and elaborate modes of transportation. This was a time that Deborah found wealth after living her whole life in poverty. However, as many good things, it all came to an end. After the book tours, Deborah fell into debt and scrambled for a way to gain back the life she had recently acquired. This is what lead to the multiple court cases that Deborah filed with Congress for compensation for her service. It took several tries, but she finally gained what she desired, compensation pay of four dollars a month (eventually raised to six dollars). After she began to earn her monthly payments from the government, her husband and her moved into a modest house and lived out the rest of their lives

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