Masculinity In Mcmurphy's

Improved Essays
Moreover, Kesey uses the character Dale Harding to show the dominance of masculinity between men. Dale Harding, the scholar with a vixen wife, is described to be a fragile-like male, with beautiful features, dainty hands, nice hair and a slim body, and educated suggest attributes fitting for a leader. Despite his beauty, his good looking wife, and his degree, Harding’s biggest trouble was his passiveness and lack of masculinity. When McMurphy is first introduced in the book, he asks to meet with the “top-man” the boss of the ward, Billy Bibbit points to Harding, the president of the Patients Council. Although, Harding had the power to make Mcmurphy live under his lead, he is rather dethroned of his role, by a character whose features represent obvious masculinity traits. Since he lacks those typical masculinity traits, he cannot be the alpha male in the ward.
In the beginning of the story a picture
…show more content…
One can argue any point as long as it can be proven through the author’s text. This novel is rich with theories and philosophy; however, thorough my eyes I can see that Kesey used the theme of social construction, characterization to demonstrate gender roles and symbols to create awareness of social issues that were relevant at his time, yet prevalent several decades after. I agree that society as a whole have denied themselves the true meaning of what freedom is, most people spent their lives trying to fit in or agreeing to everything; however, just like in the novel, we are all crazy in our natural ways, but we suppressed it because we do not want to be outcasted by the rest of society, even as I write this, I do not think I know what the true face of freedom looks like and I truly believe the entire world doesn’t know either, but I definitely can tell you the construction of colors that make this nation a nation of

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    However, there was intense pressure from his family to get married in his early twenties, and he states: “I resisted at first, but then I realized our society won’t accept me as a man who desires other men” (Gill, 12:30). In order to appear normal, his only option was to marry a woman. Although almost two-thirds of a cross-cultural study of 76 societies found that some form of same-sex sexual activity was acceptable (Kottak, p. 176), it is heavily stigmatized in some societies. Furthermore, several cultures that accept some form of same-sex sexual activity consider it a private affair, rather than “public, socially sanctioned, and encouraged” (Kottak, p. 175). In a patriarchal society, being gay counters the hypermasculine traits of alpha males and gay men are not accepted, belittled, and derided.…

    • 1529 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Meetings are a symbol in the novel that represents order and Jack’s voice being neglected by Piggy and Ralph during them suggests to the reader that he feels left out since he is not the founding member of this society. He has a confident personality that makes him feel like he should be a leader. Due to his neglection and personality, he repeatedly feels the need prove Ralph that he is pitching in and making a difference even though he isn’t a founder of the society. Another example of a neglected powerful voice is Piggy. He is often bullied by Jack and other hunters but has the knowledge to draw conclusions about the boy’s society before everyone else realizes how bad they have become.…

    • 744 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Creon is portrayed as a man who lacks wisdom but acquired great authority which ultimately causes great devastation. To add, in the conversation between Haemon and Creon, Creon mentions how he believes wisdom is unimportant to one, by unreasonably commenting,” And men my age- are we then going to school/ to learn what’s wise from men as young as him”(ln. 824-825)? Basically, this shows how although Creon has a great deal of power, through their conversation, Haemon showcases how pretentious, he really is, and he gives the illustration that he, in fact, is not what he…

    • 1104 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Masculinity In Balconville

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In modern society, it is often considered taboo for men to behave in a manner that expresses their insecurities. Indeed, men are expected to characterize themselves as dominant alpha-males where sensitivity and emotional availability are weaknesses. Such characterizations of men as domineering figures are depicted in David Fennario’s Balconville in which one of the protagonists, Johnny, spends his days loafing around on his Point St. Charles balcony instead of searching for a job. To that effect, the play suggests that men who forcefully confine themselves to a masculine ideal may be less likely to develop meaningful relationships with those around them and improve their own conditions. This is illustrated in Johnny’s weakened relationship…

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Masculinity In Powada

    • 628 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Men in rural areas, especially, believe that a strong man is understood in terms of his capacity to satisfy his wife sexually. Women are seen as sexually voracious, unable to be satisfied even by four or five men. The man who is able to satisfy and control a woman from going to other men is considered masculine. Interestingly, sexual prowess was not defined in terms of multiple partners. In the domestic sphere, the protector is viewed as a fearless and courageous man who…

    • 628 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    For years, men and women have strived to stay within social norms. These socials norms included stereotypical roles of men and women. Now, in 2018, women are gaining more rights and typical gender roles and other social norms are starting to fade, although they still have an effect in all of our lives. Shakespeare, who lived and wrote nearly 200 years before us, tried to break these “rules” of gender roles. Shakespeare plays with traditional gender stereotypes through the characters of Romeo and Juliet.…

    • 722 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Toyo-o starts out as a handsome smart man, yet a “problem” to his family, so problematic that his family even considers to get rid of him through adoption (632). To what the society expects of men, honest, tough and focused to occupation, like Taro, his elder brother, Toyo-o’s uselessness, shiftlessness, and inclination to romanticism make him an outsider to the society, a target for deception (632). Right away, it creates meaning for Manago, a female devil that is needed in the context for teaching the male protagonist-Toyo-o a lesson, indeed, helps him develop masculinity that is expected even so needed to be become grown-ups in the…

    • 1097 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Staples And Masculinity

    • 563 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Kimmel discusses different, more internal fears that come from the same place of masculinity. According to him “we’ve constructed the rules of manhood so that only the tiniest fraction of men come to believe that they are [real men]” and even when we “work to break down the isolation…to express those fears and shame, they ignore the social power [they] continue to exert over women and the privileges from which they (as middle aged, middle class white men) continue to benefit.” At the same time men who feel they are not truly men overcompensate with arrogance, leading to a cycle conflict. Black men, who naturally feel less entitled, suffer from this angst less, though it is inflamed by society more. This changes the fear of being exposed to more of a…

    • 563 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    We can see an ancient history of humans, which describes that human shares knowledge, observations, feelings etc. through language (both spoken and written). When we read ancient transcripts or books, then we may indicate that these languages which they used are gender biased in favour of the male community. In that era, females were downtrodden and they had no authority to speak against the man power. After that, that was the reason some female writers did not write her original name but choose a male name for her career like Mary Ann Evans her original name was George Eliot.…

    • 861 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    It seems as though this duel of the minds caused a great downfall of the identity and very personhood of Dennett. Having the capacity to switch between two systems on separate wavelengths (regardless of similarity) creates a huge paradox of identity. For if his minds are not completely synchronized by that very mature it makes him two separate entities. These separate entities may inhabit the same body yet their faculties differ. Furthermore, Dennett is unsure of which faculty he is operating under given he did not label the controls to find the distinction between Yorick and Hubert.…

    • 1307 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays