Masculinity And Gender: Factors And Effects Of Violence

1231 Words 5 Pages
The word violence does not exclusively refer to actions that cause bodily harm; in contrast, violence can be inflicted emotionally and sexually as well (Effects of masculinity, sex, and control). Both males and females utilize violence as a way to manipulate others (Effects of masculinity, sex, and control). Consequently, gender alone does not sufficiently account for all violent behavior. Factors that influence a person’s proclivity to behave violently include their age (the relationship of violence to gender), their recent environment (Guns, testosterone, and aggression), their religiosity (the relationship of violence to gender), whether he or she has been a victim of violence (effects of masculinity, sex, and control), and even their prenatal …show more content…
Testosterone is a natural hormone generally produced more in males than females, and higher levels of testosterone have been associated with higher levels of aggressive behavior (guns, testosterone, and aggression). While biology appears to be a contributing factor to male aggression, social beliefs about the nature of masculinity may also encourage men to behave violently. In an experiment conducted by (overdoing gender), men who were confident in their masculinity were less supportive of the Iraqi War than men who had their adherence to gender normative roles questioned, and the latter group also reported feelings of shame and guilt. The inference of this research is that the insecure men believed that masculine identity entailed supporting violence; consequently, they counterpoised their lack of confidence by endorsing war more strongly in an effort to prove their masculinity. Furthermore, both the confident and the insecure men were more likely than women to support the war. In a study conducted at a male prison, participants took tests …show more content…
However, it is important to note that masculine is not synonymous with male and feminine is not synonymous with female. Males may be feminine and females may be masculine. For example, according to a study pertaining to the contributing factors of violence within relationships, females tend to be more mentally abusive to their romantic partners than males are to theirs (effects of masculinity); however, when gender is factored out and the relationship between masculinity/femininity and mental violence is evaluated independently, high masculinity correlates with psychological violence whereas high femininity actually lowers the odds of it occurring. In this instance, gender norms and gender produce two opposite effects. High masculinity seems to be strongly associated with this type of violence between significant others, yet females are more strongly affiliated with this violent behavior than are males. Equating gender with gender norm, according to Prospero’s research, would not sufficiently account for the forces that influence the propensity a person may have to harm someone else. Another study that highlights the subtle differences between a person’s sex and their compatibility with gender typicality was conducted by (aggression, gender typical) with the purpose of assessing for a correlation between finger length ratio and aggression. Finger ratio is determined in the womb before a person is born by the level of exposure one has

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