Mary Fisher's Speech

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Having watched Mary Fisher 's speech at the Republican National Convention of 1992, I noticed these characteristics related to her attempts to engage her audience, her comparison between herself and other inflected with the same disease, and her response to the "rhetorical situation. She used many elements of immediacy to capture her audience’s attention such as words and phrases strictly for allotting participation from the audience on a topic that was so controversial during its time. It is believed that the AIDs epidemic that killed, scared and caused illnesses to so many people originated in Kinshasa, in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the 1920s. This disease was created when HIV ultimately crossed species from chimpanzees to people. …show more content…
Fisher 's speech at the Republican National Convention of 1992, showed characteristics related to her attempts to engage her audience, her comparison between herself and other inflected with the same disease, and her response to the "rhetorical situation. She engaged her audience through her use of elements of immediacy, such as using words like “we”, “us” and “our”. She actively made her audience apart of her speech by incorporating these elements into her speech. Ms. Fisher showed the comparison and connection between herself, others infected by the disease and the non-infected community. She does this in order to illustrate to infected and non-infected people that they were not alone. All in all, Ms. Fisher had a very fitting response to the “rhetorical situation” Dr. Loyd Bitzer spoke about in his paper. “The presence of rhetorical discourse obviously indicates the presence of a rhetorical situation” (Dr. L. Bitzer, 1968). Rhetorical discourse is created from the response to a situation. The situation in this case was the AIDs epidemic. Rhetorical works have been connected to moral decisions and actions. The problem with the AIDs epidemic was definitely on a moral status to Ms. Fisher. She made that very clear when she was using juxtaposition to compare and connect with her

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