Marxist Criticism And Theory

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Marxist Criticism and Theory can be summarized as such; a point of view that looks at the struggle for power between different social classes and how that relates to economics and status. Bonnycastle’s writing on Marxism involves several unique examples and types of how Marxism criticisms can be used and viewed. Bonnycastle starts his writing with the background on the theory of Marxism. The theory of Marxism is involved with creating a “good society”. A good society creates an environment where “individuals would feel free and fulfilled – not only in their work, but also in their families and friendships” (198). He also explains that the theory of Marxism is about progress in history, furthermore on how the different social classes have coincided …show more content…
Bonnycastle goes on to discuss how Marxism criticism reveals larger scale questions in everyday literature. He brings up how even reading can separate society into classes and discusses that in every victory we have, we succeed by the suffering of the losers. The next point Bonnycastle examines is how Marxism and ideology work together. First it is important to understand what ideology means. Bonnycastle uses Michael Ryan’s definition which says, “The term ideology describes the beliefs, attitudes, and habits of feeling which a society inculcates in order to generate an automatic reproduction of its surrounding premises” (200). While Bonnycastle explains many different types and uses of Ideology, it is important to realize how it coincides with Marxism. Marxist’s analyze why certain people follow ideologies, and why society keeps advocating several of the same ones over and over. They try to comprehend why economics and social classes are the way they are. It is because of these ideologies that Marxism cannot exist or why it constantly fails in societies in the past, present and …show more content…
Bonnycastle’s writing on Marxism involves several unique examples and types of how Marxism criticisms can be used and viewed. Bonnycastle starts his writing with the background on the theory of Marxism. The theory of Marxism is involved with creating a “good society”. A good society creates an environment where “individuals would feel free and fulfilled – not only in their work, but also in their families and friendships” (198). He also explains that the theory of Marxism is about progress in history, furthermore on how the different social classes have coincided with each other over the past centuries. Karl Marx had made a number of predictions about how the lower class would one day overcome the upper classes, but as time went on he was proved wrong. Upper class capitalists were actually able to improve living and working conditions. This wasn’t the only problem that came up. Communism became a problem for Marxism. While Communism was a form of the Marxism beliefs it left out many key principles Marxists have. Many individuals than associated communism with Marxism, causing issues for people to trust or believe in this way of life. But, individuals that can look past the failures of communism can see that Marxism is only looking out for humane values and improving society as a whole.

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