Examples Of Marxism In The Great Gatsby

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The world we live in has been greatly influenced and shaped by the media that has been created and put into the world. Throughout this class we have learned many media theories that have greatly affected the society we live in whether it be direct or indirect. Karl Marx was a German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist, and a socialist who developed the Marxist Theory. The Marxist Theory states that the dominant structuring agent in a society should be the well being of it’s members. In other words, Marx thinks that all of written human history has been divided by economic classes. Marxists believe that the progression of history has been pushed forward by class struggle. Marxism says that it is from this class struggle that Capitalism …show more content…
A vital argument that Karl Marx proposed was the idea that whoever had ownership over production, controlled the whole society and the whole culture. The film The Great Gatsby is set in the 1920’s where selling, manufacturing, and consuming alcohol was banned (The Prohibition). The American ideology in the 1920’s subscribed to the “American Dream”, which entails working hard and reaping the rewards regardless of the hardships one has had to face in life. The “American Dream” ideology enforces Marx’s theory that socioeconomic class determines one’s value in a capitalist hierarchy because everyone is constantly working to end goal of finishing “on top”. The character Jay Gatsby is a very wealthy man who has found his fortune in bootlegging in the time of the prohibition. Jay Gatsby created social settings for groups of wealthy and educated people. These individual’s posses a carefree and fun lifestyle where they have little concern over people who are not included in their social environment. In society this type of disregard for human life because of one’s social class can become very detrimental strictly due to the fact that creating socioeconomic barriers creates division. Jay Gatsby was well known for the extravagant parties that he threw with copious amounts of alcohol, dancers, pools, etc. Nick Carraway, the middle class narrator, arrives in West Egg as a writer and becomes curios of the man that nobody knows, Jay Gatsby. Nick aspired to meet Jay and become his friend due to Nick putting Jay on a pedestal because of his social class. Karl Marx’s theory was also greatly enforced in the part of the story where Daisy mentions that “rich girls don’t marry poor boys” and given Jay Gatsby’s past of poverty, he felt that he should strive to obtain her love by becoming wealthy. Although this strive for wealth created extravagances in Jay’s

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