Martin Luther King's Speech I Have A Dream Speech Analysis

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On August 28, 1963 one of the most important speeches in United States history was given on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. It was given by one of the most influential Civil Rights Activists in American history, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The speech was given during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom where he called to end racism and give blacks and other minorities civil and economic rights. Throughout the speech Dr. King used numerous ways to get his argument across to the public. He mentions major historical documents that declare freedom during the speech. One of the most significant forms of rhetoric Dr. King uses is repetition. This is prominent when he keeps saying, “I have a dream...” making the speech …show more content…
Martin Luther king uses important historical United States documents that give the American people freedom but are being disregarded when it comes to the freedom of African Americans. The fist major historical document he mentions is the Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln. This document freed millions of slaves and gave African American people hope for equality. Dr. King said, “This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice” (King). One hundred years later after the Emancipation Proclamation African Americans still were being held captive under the government system, not having the same opportunities as white people and being subjected to racist laws. By mentioning this document Dr. King is emphasizing that hundred years later after slavery African Americans are still being persecuted unjustly and an end to this persecution is needed immediately. In his speech Dr. King repeats each sentence with “One hundred years later…” which stresses how long its been since the the end of slavery and African Americans are still being …show more content…
King uses repetition is to add emphasis to his point of freedom for all throughout America. Dr. King says, “Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania. Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado. Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California. But not only that: Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia. Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee. Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring” (King). Dr. King mentions states that are already tolerable of African Americans first. Then he mentions the the states that are still full of racism and prejudice. He is appealing to the public emotions by saying that the first states African Americans have freedom, but that African Americans should be free in the other states as

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