Martin Luther King's Letter From Birmingham Jail

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In April of 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. found himself in the public spotlight, as he and a group of supporters engaged in direct action, protesting in downtown Birmingham, Alabama. King and the protesters were jailed, and here it was that Martin Luther King Jr. crafted the text “Letter from the Birmingham Jail.” King 's letter responded to the clergyman of Birmingham ,whose own writing, published in the Birmingham newspaper, denounced King for the timing and intention of the protests and requested that the actions cease. King 's response in “The Letter from a Birmingham Jail” provided inspiration for many during a crucial period in the Civil Rights movement. By jailing Martin Luther King Jr. and publicly opposing his actions, the leaders …show more content…
He incorporates logos throughout his entire letter, giving the letter a strong foundation that is hard for his critics to denounce. King uses logos to patiently explain in his response to the clergyman that negotiations were attempted but failed through the lines, “In these negotiating sessions certain promises were made by the merchants, such as the promises to remove the humiliating racial signs..,” and “The signs remained.” King shows that the protests were not impulsively carried out but were a planned approach in response to negotiations not taken seriously. King also wants his readers to know that the call for direct action is essential for negotiations to take place regarding the advancement of civil rights as he says, “It seeks to dramatize the issue so that it no longer can be ignored” (King). Through the device of logos, Martin Luther King Jr., is proving that direct action is needed to further civil rights as the black community has attempted to obtain actions through negotiations but that the negotiations have …show more content…
Ethos in “The Letter From a Birmingham Jail” is important to establish because King 's letter is responding to the clergyman who are of the same faith as Martin Luther King Jr. The clergyman criticize King and the protesters as “”outsiders coming in””(King). King explains his purpose for being in Birmingham and also shows his credibility through the statement, “..I too am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my particular hometown.” King intends to show the clergyman that his journey to Birmingham is similar to biblical journeys by saying, “Like Paul, I must constantly respond to the Macedonian call for

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