How Did Black Power Impact The Civil Rights Movement

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Black Power is a powerful movement in support of rights for black people, it was especially prominent in the US in the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. The extent at which Black Power impacted the civil rights protest movement is debatable when compared to other campaigns.
One argument for Black Power having more impact on the civil rights protest movement than the more non violent movements was the expectation of non violent figures such as Martin Luther King. In source 1 King underestimated how long the Montgomery Bus Boycott would last. Martin Luther King was under the assumption that the white authorities and public would be more compassionate. He expected white people to change their views and treat black Americans as human beings.
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Source 3 shows that Kings plans were well thought out. If he could win in Birmingham, one of the most racist cities in America, he could win anywhere and he planned to- his ambitions were huge and extremely admirable. He started with a challenging city and made huge successes bringing hope to those who believed equality wasn 't possible. And although using white help isn 't completely empowering , it is incredibly effective. The media had a big interest in Martin Luther King so just his presence brought the media 's attention to what he was involved in. King had the power of the media on his side and this could make substantial differences to the civil rights movement. If Martin Luther King could remove the ignorance of racism then he could get both white and black support to fight laws and social stigmas about race. That is potentially double the supporters of Black Power. The impact of Martin Luther King having support from both black Americans and white Americans meant that equality was easier to achieve especially as authorities would be less likely to hurt the protesters if some were white. It 's less complicated to get equality from people who want to give it rather than take it with …show more content…
One was that some leaders that supported Black Power had limited appeal, this is shown in source 4. In Malcolm X 's situation it was the fact he wasn 't Christian. America was a very Christian country, so this gave white Americans another excuse to reject his ideas and treat him as a villain. This also put off some black American supporters as many civil rights advocates and activists were devote Christians. Although it was unfair he was judged for his religion, it still happened and it was still very much important to the general public. The impact of Black Power supporters not always appealing to all types of people was that the potential number of supporters was not met. It also showed how important the media was to the civil rights protest movement. If the media didn 't like it, neither did the people. Unfortunately, the media didn 't take kindly to most Black Power supporters such as Malcolm X who were depicted as dangerous individuals. Religion obviously played a big role too. X could have had many more supporters (than he already did) if people cared less about what religion he believed

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