How Did Martin Luther King Jr Fight For Civil Rights

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Martin Luther King Jr. Was a civil rights activist who advocated for fair treatment of African Americans. He was asked by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to assist in the fight for civil rights in Birmingham, Alabama; where a meeting was to be held. King was arrested as a result of the sit-in at luncheon counters, and while he was in prison, he wrote a letter to a group of clergymen who had criticized his position. This was not the first time he was arrested, nor the last time he would be arrested. He believed that people should not obey immoral laws, and that it is our duty as moral people to go against these laws to try to change them in a peaceful approach. Jacobus said “Although King himself was nonviolent, his program left both him and his followers open to …show more content…
King Wrote “But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mother and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; when you have seen men curse, kick, and even kill your black brothers and sisters...” (King 381). This is what African Americans faced while they tried living a normal life. This is the reason why he fought for equality and justice for his people and all the minorities in the United States. His fight was mainly against unjust and immoral laws; laws that allowed this type of injustice to go on without any repercussion. While, Thoreau was mostly against the whole government, because he believed that the whole government was the cause of these unjust laws, like he states several times in his piece. Thoreau believes that it’s time for a revolution, so that the corrupt government is no more and a new and just government takes its place. King on the other hand just wants to change the current laws he deems immoral and has no thoughts of a revolution. At the time of King Slavery was no longer a problem, but in Thoreau’s time it was and he was strongly against

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