Martin Luther King Jr And Gandhi Comparison Essay

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Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. wanted to see a change made in not only their countries, but in the worlds they lived in. Both of them pushed for a nonviolent society in which their communities and families could live in. Despite what was going on around them, they always tried to take the route of less resistance, even if that meant being spit on, arrested and even thrown in jail. Mahatma Gandhi was a key ingredient to the growth of Indian Nationalism, while Martin Luther King, Jr. was a main reason the Civil Rights Movement became as big as it did with the help of some other notable men and women. Social change was inevitable for both of these men, but they both had to go through road blocks and naysayers to achieve that goal. …show more content…
It is also a social virtue to be cultivated like other virtues. Surely society is largely regulated by the expression of nonviolence in its mutual meanings. What I asked for is an extension of it on a larger, national and international scale” (p. 209). Mahatma Gandhi understood that it was easy to be nonviolent and non-confrontational when there were no issues going on, but when people were challenging those protesting, were they going to continue to stand their ground and remain nonviolent. He wanted to challenge people to remain true to the movement and see that more could be accomplished through peaceful protest as opposed to burning down buildings and destroying the places they lived. Having that self-control and it is a skill that has to be cultivated, grown, and matured. He understood that the society itself wanted to be non-violent in order to follow his guidance, but he also understood that it needed to be on a much larger scale in order to get the full point across. The government played a huge part in how Gandhi treated the situations he was involved …show more content…
Martin Luther King, Jr. was another man of great works. Though he had flaws just as a man in the world, he brought so much awareness to issues in not only the United States during his lifetime, but the world as well. One of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s most famous work was done from a jail cell in Birmingham, Alabama after being arrested for one of his many sit ins and protests of the way law enforcement and people of non-African descent were treating those of color in the United States of America, which was not so united at the time. Martin was born in Atlanta, Georgia in 1929 and became a minister like his father after graduating from Morehouse College. He went to seminary after receiving his Bachelor’s degree and eventually got his Doctorate from Boston University (p. 225). His famous “Letter from Birmingham Jail” shed light on the current racial issues and divides plaguing the country and his

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