Martin Luther King Jr Analysis

1568 Words 7 Pages
People thought, “well if FDR was able to dig us out of that hole, maybe the federal government is not really all that bad.” From the 1930’s in FDR’s presidency to the 1960’s during Johnson’s presidency, we saw a massive growth in the central government, and the individualistic America was very much okay with it because it was getting the job done. The citizens were happy to see the government able to step in and begin to help solve their problems, but that wasn’t the only reason why FDR’s presidency was so successful. FDR had a knack for public speaking. Historical accounts claim that when he would come over the radio in households across America discussing an important topic, everyone would take a ‘sigh’ of relief because of the way he talked …show more content…
Martin Luther King Jr. Many know the story behind Dr. King and why he protested. He rallied against the discrimination of black Americans saying that they had the same rights as whites. A key element to his argument was that of civil disobedience or non-violence. Examples of this would include sit-ins, boycotts etc. A big reason why this is such an intricate part to our nation’s history is how we dealt with it. Individuals on their own weren’t getting anywhere. MLK and others like Stokely Carmichael could rally and protest all they want, but that wasn’t changing the views of the public. The general public were going to continue to act this way regardless of what these gentlemen had to say. It wasn’t until the Federal Courts, The Supreme Court, and the Federal Government stepped in that pieces actually started moving. The institution of the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act and the ‘Brown vs. Board of Education’ ruling were all key determinants in the process the Federal Government took for African Americans to receive rights. Not only did African American individuals struggle with receiving equality, women in this time period struggled as well. As individuals, women were not really allowed to do anything. Prewitt explains how the American men had a philosophy of protectionism or the idea that women had to be sheltered from life’s cruelties. Racial discrimination and gender discrimination are very …show more content…
Coming over from Europe, our ancestors chose the furthest thing they could from their previous British rulers. However, as history has shown us, individualism cannot be the only way. There needs to be some other form of power. It is interesting though, it seems like all throughout history, human kind has a natural want to be an individualist. Whether it be the colonists first arriving in America or even the African American and women, they all began to try and fight on their own. It wasn’t until crisis hit like the American Revolution or riots and death that the people decided that a higher power needed to be involved. It is almost like once it got to the point where people either weren’t listening to them, or the situation was simply out of their control, that is where they needed the government to step in. Now I am not necessarily advocating for a socialistic or communist style country, because we all know how those turn out (USSR, China etc.). I am, however, acknowledging the fact that we cannot be pushing for more individual freedoms. As a country, we need our government. Our government is what keeps us afloat in times of trouble. When war strikes, we deploy the worlds strongest army to protect our homeland. When our economy takes a dive, we look to the government for welfare programs to help dig us out. I understand that ‘absolute power corrupts absolutely,’ but isn’t that also why we have checks

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