Essay On Protestant Reformation

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When Martin Luther King said “Against this first wall, we will direct our attack”, he was referring to the Three Walls of Romanists in his Ninety-Five thesis against the Catholic Church, not a physical attack. However, Luther’s thesis would trigger the Protestant Reformation which would come to have violent ramifications all over Europe, which brings us to my thesis. Does religion incite or cause conflict? Both warfare and religion are large and diverse subjects, so this essay will look at some of the areas where these two areas coincided within Europe and the United States.
In central and western Europe, the Catholic Church had grown extremely rich and powerful. So, when Martin Luther kick started the Protestant Reformation, it incited
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In Spain, King Charles V and his son Phillip II spent much of their lives fighting wars that emerged due to the Reformation, such as the War with the Huns. King Charles “undertook the war with greater energy and better equipment than before” and it showed as the desert palace of Khan “no longer has a trace of human population, which testifies to the many battles fought there and the great amount of blood shed”. Inspired by the new Protestant Doctrines, the Netherlands also rose up and rebelled against the Habsburg family. In fact, many Protestants arrived from other countries, seeking refuge in the Netherlands. However, Phillip’s government ignored agreement stuck between the Protestants and the Catholics who were striving for peace. In turn, the Netherlands ruptured in anger which boiled over into a civil war. The result was catastrophic as thousands died both Catholic and Protestant, personal lives were upturned, and the economy weakened.
The effects of the reformation weren’t just limited to western and central Europe. In 1576, Queen Elizabeth of England publicly aligned herself with rebels in the Netherlands and began to pursue an alliance with Protestant forces throughout Europe. In return, Phillip II prepared to invaded England. In 1588 the Spanish Armada set sail but in a surprising reversal, the Armada was destroyed by the English and a fierce storm, nicknamed the “Protestant

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