Marriage In Kate Chopin's The Awakening

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Kate Chopin 's The Awakening was criticized heavily. Different critics shared their opinions on marriage, feminism, relationships, and the decisions that affected characters in The Awakening. Chopin gave many scenarios where these views were put to the test and it was interesting to see how everyone dealt with their responsibilities. Depending on previous experiences, readers will feel differently about most of the events happening in the novel. Our main characters had a lot of challenges to overcome and we see them either evolve or destruct. While using many characters as an example, Chopin explored the negative and positive aspects of the marriage between Edna and Leoncé, while dealing with responsibilities and challenges in life. The most …show more content…
It almost seems as if being single was uncommon, and if you were, you were involved intimately with a married person. Our main characters Edna Pontellier, Robert LeBrun, and Léonce Pontellier were involved in what some would describe as a love triangle. Other married woman in the novel, Adéle Ratignolle, a woman who centered her life around her husband and Madame LeBrun, a widowed woman are more like the traditional idea of what a woman was supposed to be like back then. Chopin set herself apart from many authors by using details that were either explicit or realistic, which is what made The Awakening that much more interesting to …show more content…
Chopin included the children when it was necessary to show that no matter what, Edna still has responsibilities. Taking that into consideration, you would think Edna puts her children first when it came to the decisions she made. For example, moving out of their home puts the children in a vulnerable state, they are now torn between two parents. Edna spends more time thinking about a life she wants to have without her husband and children, rather than taking care of what she already has. Edna realizes the obligation she has to her children, but her actions show opposite. A wife, mother, and woman would not make these decisions without thinking of what is supposed to be the most important thing in her life, her

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