Mark Twain And Daisy Miller And Huckleberry Finn Similarities

1166 Words 5 Pages
The two fictional American classics The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and Daisy Miller by Henry James were written during the time frame of the Civil War era. Twain and James are realistic writers and have created a youthful main character for their novel that represents realism, but they go about it in a different way. Both authors grew up at a time in their lives when influential things were happening in their worlds such as the Civil War, and the constant disruption between the social classes. The two main characters from each classic are Huckleberry Finn and Daisy Miller, and they are both set in a different setting and genre, however, they can relate to each others similarities in both personality and background. Daisy …show more content…
Huck and Daisy are both young Americans, who are rebellious and independent whose parents or guardians have difficulties raising them, and both are adventurous explorers who are looking for their own freedom, which is also one of the themes from each story. The first similarity between Huckleberry Finn and Daisy Miller is that they both want to escape to have their own freedom. Huck and Daisy are both trying to escape this gaze in their search of freedom. Huck is always being told what to do by Miss Watson such as, starching clothes, cleaning, and teaching certain manners around the house. When days go by living with Miss Watson, he is just a young man with a troubled background, who is forced to follow her strict rules. Huck wanted to have a smoke, but Miss Watson would not let him: “I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn’t. She said it was a mean practice and wasn’t clean, and I must try to not do it anymore” (Twain 132). Miss Watson watches Huck like a hawk such as, “Don’t put your feet up …show more content…
Huck is forced to do the everyday routine with Miss Watson 's chores and rules for living in her house such as cleaning the house or learning table manners; however, he does not enjoy being trapped and being told what to do. He is being taught by Miss Watson that a tight collar is better for a body than loose-fitting clothes one can move in, or how a fork can possibly be easier to use than one 's hands. For Daisy 's point of view, the rules being broken were not quite so simple. She enjoys using table manners or dressing in appropriate fashion and her rebellion comes in the way of drawing room manners. She wants to run around with whoever she has her eyes on at the moment, and she sees anything wrong with holding several suitors at once. People around town whispering and gossiping about her getting around with so many men, yet she does not care but to laugh at them and make a fool out of herself. She goes so far as to throw it in their faces as such, by running around at all hours of the day and night alone with one or another of her suitors. While neither of the main characters care about their social norm, there is a bigger picture of not just two rebellions, but two independent minded against a closed minded conservative society. Their natural intelligence and willingness to think through situations on their own merits and follow their own instincts allows them

Related Documents