Maritime Port Security Essay

4933 Words Sep 20th, 2010 20 Pages
MARITIME TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ACT OF 2002: A CRITIQUE
PORT SECURITY
HLSS645
Theaurthus Grant
July 24, 2010
TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. A Brief Legislative History of the Bill 3
2. Review of Previous Legislation: The Need for MTSA 4 3. Summary of Pertinent Provisions of the MTSA 7 4. Strengths and Weaknesses of MTSA 10 5. Final Assessment and Recommendations to Strengthen MTSA 15

REFERENCES 17
1. A Brief Legislative History of the Bill The United States (US), who is a party to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), has long been pushing for a response to the issue of maritime security worldwide. Prompted by the US, the IMO agreed to make security amendments to the Safety of Life
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In 2000, only two assessments for safety and security plans were conducted (The Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation, 2001). The National Infrastructure Security Committee (NISC) of the US Department of Transportation was created after September 11, and is charged with the responsibility of focusing on intermodal security issues and to ensure coordination of the Department’s security work across all modes of transportation. Direct Action Groups were created within NISC to make recommendations for action on legislative, regulatory and diplomatic initiatives for each mode of transportation. S. 1214, The Port, Maritime, and Rail Security Act of 2001, was introduced by Senator Hollings of South Carolina, as a new paradigm in maritime and port security in the US. In discussing these initiatives, then Secretary of Transportation, Norman Mineta, in a Statement before the Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation, discussed that focusing exclusively on security at ports is not enough. A comprehensive approach that looks beyond ports and port facilities, embracing the entire marine transportation system, is crucial. It should involve not only large seaports but smaller ports as well as ports of all sizes handling bulk cargoes, and the security of coastal waters and inland waterways (Mineta, 2001). Admiral James M. Loy, on the same occasion before the

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