Marcus Garvey's Influence: An Important Impact Of The Harlem Renaissance

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Originally, and once called the New Negro Movement, the Harlem Renaissance was a rise in the African-American culture which embraced the theatrical, visual arts, music, and literary works of African-Americans. It took place from 1917 until 1932. In the midst of that time, the Harlem Renaissance was going on other important events in history were happening such as World War 1, which was from 1914 until 1918, the Great Migration which started in 1916, and the Great Depression which started in 1929. Involved in this movement were the African-Americans, including famous figures such as Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Bessie Smith, Paul Robeson, Langston Hughes, Louis Armstrong, and Duke Ellington. The Harlem Renaissance took place and centered …show more content…
In addition to that, a plethora of other African-Americans created the own expertise in music, theater, and painting. Activism took place during this time and most activists spoke on racism and oppression. Politics were also important during this time. Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, and W.E.B. Dubois had huge influences on people and around the world. Not only was the movement in Harlem it was happening around the world. Marcus Garvey had a strong impact in the Caribbean and other countries around the world. As a result, he became an iconic figure of the roaring twenties, and made his own religion called "Rastafari", and his followers were called "Rastafarians". A Jim Crow law was in place at this time as well. Most influences at the time of this law were encouraging African-Americans to be more like white people. Songs were written by many artists who helped and encourage the African-Americans as well as the white people to become equal with equal rights. One of the major causes of the Harlem Renaissance was the Great Migration. During this time almost two million African-Americans moved from the south to the north for a better life because of the economy up there. The south prevented and made laws for African-Americans to have them not vote and also mandated racial segregation. The timing …show more content…
As a result of new dances such as the Charleston, the Black Bottom, the Shimmy, Turkey trot and the Cakewalk. Famous new dancers such as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, The Nicholas Brothers, Stepin Fetchit, Butterbeans and Suzy and Evelyn Welch, Josephine Baker, George Snowden, Herbert White, Earl "Snakehips" Tucker, Mildred Dixon and Florence Mills not only were jazz musicians, but they performed these dances for their audiences in a place called the Cotton club. The Cotton club was actually one of the most famous hot spots in the night in Harlem which was located on 142nd Street and Lenox Avenue. The cotton club lasts from 1923 until 1935. During this time it was a Whites only place. All of the famous African-American musicians, dancers, and singers all performed at this place. Langston Hughes and Judy Garland also made special guest

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