Marcus Garvey: The Tragedy Of White Injustice

625 Words 3 Pages
Problems continued to grow for Garvey starting in 1919 when on October 14 he was shot in an assassination attempt in Harlem, New York. In addition internal critiques within the UNIA of Garvey began to arise noting his intolerance of dissent, poor management skills, and ineptitude in directing the organization's finances which he had increasingly used to support his own lifestyle. Even his first marriage to journalist Amy Ashwood (1897-1969) during this period was short lived and ended in divorce in 1922. Soon after, in April 1922, the Black Star Line itself ceased operations owing to technologically problematic vessels, a lack of financial skill, poor crew choices, and corporate mismanagement. Garvey's difficulties continued when in June …show more content…
In addition, while in Jamaica, Garvey also published newspapers such as The Blackman (1929-1931) and the New Jamaican (1932-1933). In 1928, Garvey returned to Europe travelling to England, France, Belgium, and Germany. During this trip, Garvey presented a petition to the League of Nations and spoke at Hyde Park in favour of rights for the working class discussing oppression and …show more content…
As a result, despite his popularity in the Jamaican African community, Garvey lost his election bid to the legislature which favoured white colonial leaders and electoral laws. By 1935 Garvey had moved back to London, England were he would reside for the final years of his life, leaving his wife and family behind in Jamaica, while he sought to reinvigorate the declining influence of his movement and ideas as well as establish the School of African Philosophy. On January 20, 1940, Garvey suffered a stroke leaving him paralyzed on his right side. Several months later, on June 10 following a series of subsequent strokes Garvey passed away in West Kensington, London, England. His body was initially interred in Kensal Green Roman Catholic Cemetery in London, however Amy Jacques' soon sought the repatriation of his remains, an act which was challenged by Garvey's first wife Amy Ashwood. Regardless Marcus Garvey's remains were returned to Jamaica on November 10, 1964 and were ultimately buried in the National Heroes Park in

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