How Did Mao Zedong Influence The Chinese Revolution

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During the Chinese Cold War and Chinese Revolution, multiple leaders had contradicting opinions of how to rule the country. Revolutionary leader, Mao Zedong, once said,” The ultimate perspective of the Chinese Revolution is not capitalism but socialism and communism” (N.pag.).Throughout his education, Mao Zedong believed that communism could help China grow stronger, and he also saw the importance of all people during revolutions (Zedong N.pag.). Mao wanted the Chinese Government to become communist, but his early attempts ended up forcing him into hiding. As the Japanese imperialist forces began to push into China, Mao and his forces were called on to help stop the invasion (Biography N.pag.). After defeating the Japanese imperialist, a revolution …show more content…
During his time in the mountains, Mao formed an army of guerilla fighters (Biography N.pag.). While Mao was in the mountains, more and more supporters joined his cause, and he kept building up a bigger military force. The majority of Mao’s followers were the peasants who believed that his concepts would help to give them achieve new rights and improve their living conditions. During the war preparations, Mao believed that China had two possible futures depending on what happened in the battle (Zedong N.pag.). When Mao led the peasant army to fight the Japanese imperialist, he used strategies that enabled people from Chiang’s army to help surround the Japanese, and soon the Japanese imperialist were forced to leave China. The Japanese imperialist were like the conspirators in Julius Caesar as they had to retreat after failing to gain power. Even though the battle with Japanese forces was over, the tensions in China were still …show more content…
The fighting in China changed from fighting the Japanese to fighting each other. Mao and his forces took advantage of Chiang’s weak forces, and took control of China. After his triumph, Mao put his communist government philosophies into place, and he tried to reform industries (Gifford 29, 30). When trying to explain his thoughts on china Mao declared, “Today, two big mountains lie like a dead weight on the Chinese people. One is imperialism, the other is feudalism (Zedong N.pag.). The Chinese people had doubt about Mao and his As Mao attempted to transform the entire society, it became known that his leadership skills were lacking. Mao started to take children out of schooling and train them to become soldiers, and during the training and transition, many of the kids died from starvation and malnutrition. The Chinese economy looked like it was on the verge of a total collapse, but the publishing of the Little Red Book full of Mao’s Quotes and concepts gave people a sense of hope (Gifford 30). Mao used his power to reshape the way the Chinese society

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