Manpower Requirement Approach Essay

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The Manpower Requirements Approach The main thrust behind the manpower requirements approach is conducted and employed for the purpose of ascertaining future educational staff requirements, through an assessment that is based on current economic trends (Bray & Varghese, 2010). According to EFA (2014), the manpower requirements approach has had an important effect on the design and available human resources for schools around the world. EFA (2014) described an example of how this planning approach assisted in accurately estimating the educational staffing needs in the African country of Tanzania. The national government of this fledgling African nation employed this planning approach and discovered that they could lower their current estimates …show more content…
One of them is called the intra-educational extrapolation approach. This model proposes that planning should be conducted with the data that is already known and centers on only a single plan. Through this approach, planners can examine the amount of time needed and the financial support required to meet the necessities for a particular program. This approach also encourages seminars to engage institutional associates as crucial choices are made for a school 's …show more content…
This planning method is used to plan for social progress, and it is rooted in finding the best ways of bringing about increased social rights and equity through the national goals and rights set forth, towards the poor and the socially disadvantaged, in a particular nation 's constitution. This approach is, in fact, a form of educational borrowing in that it seeks to follow thriving examples of planning that have been employed by other institutions of learning throughout the world. This system is one that is often chosen by education professionals who are interested in the increased social and individual rights of their people and other nation 's people 's rights as they plan their educational goals and the best ways to achieve them. In addition, Isave (2011) revealed the basic tenants of the resource-based approach to educational planning. In this method of planning for a school 's future, educational planners try to ensure that their level of financial ability is equally paired up with the institution 's accessible manpower. Though the intent of this approach is wise and logical in making sure that an institution 's financial resources are equal to their human ones, it is only really practical to employ in financially stable schools that have the funds to meet their planned

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