Manipulation In Aeneid

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Virgil’s epic Aeneid, portrays the literary stereotypes of Roman women when holding a position of power. The Aeneid, epic is focused on the after math of the Trojan War. The epic addresses the trials and tribulations of a Trojan named Aeneas, struggle to fulfill his fate to make a new kingdom in Italy. Throughout Virgil’s The Aeneid, the will of the goddesses forces Aeneas through adversity and misadventure. The antagonist Juno, a powerful divine goddess, driven by resentment allows emotions to dictate her decisions to intervene in Aeneas fate. Virgil’s Aeneid, offers a stereotypical representation of women in power. The epic exposes that women in power tend to allow their emotions dictate their actions, are quick to react and leading to destruction …show more content…
Throughout Virgil’s epic, Juno uses different forms of manipulation. She directly seeks help for her plans or does them herself. Juno seeks help from other gods to help her deteriorate Aeneas and his men on their journey to Italy. Led by anger Juno asks Aeouls god of wind, for help. Juno commands him to cause a profound turbulence of wind to drive the men off their course. To get Aeolus to complete her demands she offers him the marriage of her fairest nymph Deiopea (Virgil 687). Juno is very cunning and clever in the way she thinks out her plans for people to complete her objective that she asks of them. This attempt was did not succeed. Juno goes to extreme lengths by using her beloved queen of Carthage in an effort to prohibit Aeneas from traveling to his destination. Additionally Juno deceives Aeneas mother Venus, by making a false agreement of peace offering if Dido and Aeneas are to be married. However, being skeptical of Juno, Venus accepts this offer. This demonstrates that Juno is prepared to sacrifice her own cherished people achieve her selfish plans. This ultimately concludes with the suicide of Dido the treasured queen of Carthage. Virgil describes Juno third attempt to continue inflicting pain on the men by “Juno had plans afoot, her ancient rancor not yet satisfied” (Virigil ?) Juno is not satisfied with her failed attempts against fate. In book five, Juno sends her …show more content…
The main antagonist Juno is used as a great example of the perspectives the Romans shared on correlation between gender and power. Juno’s emotions undermine her reasoning. This leads the downfall of many men. Virgil leads the reader to interpret the text that women in power are thought to be led by their emotions, and will end in the destruction of men for redundant

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