Manipulation And Facade In The Tragedy Of Julius Caesar

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Manipulation and Facade in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar In a world which has survived on manipulation throughout history, many people find it necessary to continually present a facade, a mask, in order to prevent themselves from being manipulated and caught up in another 's plots. If someone were to show his true self to the world, letting everyone see his thoughts, fears, and intentions, he would become easy to take advantage of, easily manipulated, by others. This is demonstrated in the play, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, as many figures find themselves caught up in the plots of others. This manipulation is a result of the individuals ' weaknesses within their facade. This manipulation is best exemplified by the tragic figure, Brutus, as …show more content…
This weakness is especially seen when Antony speaks to the conspirators after they murdered Caesar. He tells them, "Friends am I with you all, and love you all, / Upon this hope, that you shall give me reasons / Why, and wherein, Caesar was dangerous" (III.i.220-222). Brutus does not see where Antony 's true loyalties lie, so he believes that Antony can do no harm, causing Brutus to allow Antony to speak at Caesar 's funeral. Brutus underestimates Antony, as previously revealed when Brutus told Cassius, "If he [Antony] love Caesar, all that he can do / Is to himself - take thought and die for Caesar. / And that were mush he should, for he is given / To sports, to wildness, and much company" (II.i.186-189). Even if Brutus 's drastically incorrect appraisal of Antony had not led to Brutus believing him to be harmless, Antony 's facade is strong enough that Brutus believes Antony agreed with Brutus 's opinion of the murder of Caesar as necessary for Rome. This strong facade hides Antony 's true feelings until he speaks in his soliloquy, exclaiming, "O pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, / That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!" (III.i.254-255). When Antony hides his emotions, he is able to successfully manipulate the conspirators into believing that he is harmless, giving Antony the chance to orchestrate the downfall of the …show more content…
Cassius portrays Caesar to the other conspirators, stating, "Poor man, I know he would not be a wolf / But that he sees the Romans are but sheep;" (I.iii.104-105). The conspirators are able to see Caesar 's ambition and how it will continue to grow, justifying their need to kill him. In some ways, they know more about Caesar than he does himself. Caesar presents a facade not only outward, but also to himself; he blinds himself with his arrogance leaving himself open to the manipulation of the conspirators. Another conspirator, Decius, knows how to manipulate Caesar into coming to the Senate, telling the others, "But when I tell him he [Caesar] hates flatterers / He says he does, being then most flattered" (II.i.207-208). The gap in Caesar 's facade causes him to be easily controlled by the conspirators, ultimately leading to his

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