Man As A Hero In Arthur Miller's The Crucible

1598 Words 7 Pages
Every single person has their imperfections, but that doesn’t mean it should hold them back from showing their true potential. Man can be hero in spite of having some flaws. Arthur Miller writes The Crucible to show the terrible outcome of the Salem Witch Trials and how it tears the town apart. John Proctor carries around some pretty big sins with him that blacken his name; however, he accepts his flaws by becoming a hero to the town of Salem, Elizabeth, and himself. John sacrifices his life to illustrate to the town of Salem that he is innocent along with all the others that are convicted of witchcraft. From the beginning of the play, John knows that all the talk about witchcraft coming into the town is bogus. He tries to convince Abigail …show more content…
Judge Danforth listens to John’s plea and infers that John can possibly be making up the information just to have Elizabeth released. Danforth informs John that Elizabeth is pregnant and will have to wait a year to be hanged. He is hopeful that John will now walk away knowing that his wife is safe: “Good, then, she is saved at least this year, and a year is long. What you say, sir? It is done now. Will you drop this charge?” (Miller 1296). After a moment of thinking, John knows that he cannot simply leave with a jail cell full of innocent people. He must fight against the court for what he thinks is right. Even though all seems to be going well toward the beginning, Mary Warren ends up convicting him of also being a witch. Despite all of his effort, John ends up with all of the others, and his secret of having an affair is out. After much consideration and thinking about whether to lie or end his life, John admits to witchcraft in front of Danforth but cannot hand over the paper that has his name written on it: “God does not need my name nailed upon the church! God sees my name; God knows how black my sins are! It is enough!” (Miller 1332). John tears the paper in half as his anger …show more content…
His sins follow him all the way back before the talk of witchcraft comes into Salem. When Abigail Williams is his servant, the two of them become a little too close for comfort, and John decides to sleep with her. Shortly after, he completely regrets that action as it puts a strain on his relationship with Elizabeth. John fills himself with grief and sadness as he realizes just how stupid the mistake was and constantly starts to put himself down over it. It is truly shown just how much John hates himself for committing the act when Abigail approaches him alone in the town and begins to ramble on about how perfect they would be together. He is fed up with her attitude and tells her the cold, harsh truth: “Abby, I may think of you softly from time to time. But I will cut off my hands before I’ll ever reach for you again” (Miller 1246). Even if Abigail knows how John feels about her, it doesn’t stop her from going after Elizabeth, which makes John even more frustrated. After John’s secret is out, and he is about to be hanged, he knows that he must leave with a purpose. He takes his last final moments to talk with his wife, and she forgives him for what he has done to her. John then warns Danforth that he will not tell another lie and have God hear him say it. When John steps up onto the platform to be hanged, he can finally breathe without feeling

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