Male And Media Representation Of Man In The Media

2078 Words 9 Pages
The ideal man has been ever changing. In modern society, the classic male appears tall, chiseled, and strong. How does this image impact a man 's view of himself? According to one study, males who see men doing performance-based activities actually felt worse about their appearance, vs men who had just viewed an image of a muscular looking man, posing. “ ...participants who viewed the performance-focused images actually reported poorer overall appearance satisfaction and poorer fitness satisfaction than participants who were exposed to the aesthetic-focused images or scenery.” (Mulgrew, K. E., el al., 2014, p.457). This leads me to believe that a man feels that it 's important that he is viewed as muscular, strong and skillful, more so than …show more content…
Has this aggressive behavior represented in the media caused an increase in men acting more aggressive in their day to day lives? There are more violent crimes committed by males. Between 1976-2000, 87.9% of those charged with homicide were men (Scharrer, 2005, p. 353). However, is it fair to say that media has an impact on these males? Does aggressive behavior being watched make all men more aggressive, or does it only make those men who are more prone to aggression more aggressive? Does the type of media matter? In one study, the more realistic the show, the more likely it is to bring out aggressive hyper-masculine behavior, “The results also point fairly clearly to the conclusion that responses to violent television stimuli will differ depending on the nature of the violent depiction(Atkin, 1983; Berkowitz & Alioto, 1973; Jo & Berkowitz, 1994). The more realistic television stimulus—which also combined HM and violent portrayals—resulted in larger increases in aggressive responses to the constructed scenarios compared to the less realistic television stimulus that contained violence but no evidence of HM.” (Scharrer, 2005, p. 371). Furthermore, watching or reading about …show more content…
As the famous actor Tina fey, (2011) once noted, “Now every girl is expected to have Caucasian blue eyes, full Spanish lips, a classic button nose, hairless Asian skin with a California tan, a Jamaican dance hall ass, long Swedish legs, small Japanese feet, the abs of a lesbian gym owner, the hips of a nine-year-old boy, the arms of Michelle Obama, and doll tits.” Females are seen as objects in the media rather than humans. They are used as coat hangers to show off clothes, and dolls to sell makeup products. The media ads seem to demean women into thinking they should be nothing more than a pretty face. Now this doesn’t necessarily mean media is the main route to a women’s body dissatisfaction but does it play a part? There is a staggering amount of young females who are unhappy with their bodies, “They reported that 44% of the American young girls believed they were overweight and 60% were actively trying to lose weight although majority of these girls were within normal weight range.” (Javaid, M., & Ahmad, I., 2014, p.30). It’s no doubt that girls are ashamed about their bodies, because the women on T.V are so much smaller than the average women, “A report of the British Medical Association’s Board of Science and Education (Cussins, 2001) stated that the actresses and models had 10-15% body fat whereas the average body fat for healthy women is 22-26%.” (Javaid, M., & Ahmad, I., 2014, p.30). So, if media is

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