Malcolm X's Revist Approach To The Civil Rights Movement

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The conclusion of the 1861 Civil War was the first step towards black rights, which changed the titles of blacks from “property” to “citizen”. Although blacks were granted freedom from the oppression of slavery, they were still oppressed legislatively by the Jim Crow laws. These laws displayed major segregation between the whites and blacks through racial separations “from classrooms and bathrooms, from theaters and train cars, from juries and legislatures” (Foner & Garraty). This proved that the end of slavery was not the end of oppression, which frustrated many blacks. They were forced to obey the unjust word of government like they had to before their emancipation. The more the whites mistreated blacks as undesired dirt, the greater their desire for retaliation intensified.
Peacefully guiding this need for
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His aggressiveness greatly contrasted with Martin Luther King Jr.’s pacifist approach. As a child he was exposed to direct racial violence when “Ku Klux Klan terrorists burned his house, and his father was later murdered” (“54h. Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam”). Traumatization is one of strongest drives for radical desires to spawn from, especially during childhood. This experience most likely had a major contribution to Malcolm X’s violent approach in the civil rights movement. The trauma allowed him to gain awareness and respect for his racial roots as a black. He is deeply offended and angered by the past enslavement of Africans, so “he took the last name of a variable: X” because he “[believed] his true lineage to be lost” (“54h. Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam”). An individual who believed he was deeply connected to his past, Malcolm X prepared himself to go down as a historical figure. Death ends a person’s life physically, while names immortalize them in thoughts, and Malcolm passionately wanted his ideals to live on

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