Malaria Global Patterns

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What are the causes of the global patterns of Malaria?

A countries environment and climate are huge factors that affect the predominance of malaria within that country. Mosquitos thrive in warm areas and can only live in temperatures above 16 degrees Celsius.
The African Region accounts for 85% of malaria cases and 90% of malaria deaths worldwide. The year round warm climate in sub Saharan Africa provides perfect conditions for mosquitos and the malaria parasite to reproduce quickly and go through their life cycle quickly, which is necessary for infection. In Sub Saharan Africa the temperature rarely drops below 16 degrees Celsius, so the mosquitos are able to infect all year round. Some countries are not affected by Malaria because their
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This is why the impact of malaria takes its toll on the poorest as they are the people who are unable to afford preventative measures and medical treatment. Malaria is not necessarily caused by poverty but is more accurately a consequence of it caused by insanitary sewage treatment, unsafe and unclean drinking water, poor hygiene, little education, substandard housing and/or inability to access or afford health care. Because of this around 300 – 600 million people suffer from Malaria each year and over 1 million people die from Malaria each year. India is one country hugely affected by malaria. A study on malaria interventions in the Mumbai slums shows that in the central part of the city Parel, 90% of the population live below the poverty line and cannot afford preventative measures against malaria.” This is a problem as malaria is a huge issue in this part of India and without medication and treatment malaria is …show more content…
Africa loses approximately 12 billion dollars each year in loss of productivity. Malaria also affects tourism, inhibits foreign investments and affects crop production. All leading to a lower GDP. Diseases such as Malaria are one of the leading factors that prevent countries and individuals from escaping the poverty cycle. For example Nigeria is a third world country with a lot of its population living in poverty. 97% of Nigeria’s population is at risk of contracting Malaria; this puts Nigeria as one of the most at risk countries worldwide. Nigeria has around 100 million malaria cases each year and over 300,000 deaths. These extremely high statistics could be one reason why Nigeria’s GDP was as low as 3,005 USD in 2013 and much of its population are unable to escape the poverty cycle. Countries like Myanmar and Pakistan are also unable to escape the poverty cycle for this same

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