Themes In The Gospel Of Mark

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The Gospel of Mark

The gospel of Mark was authored by John Mark; Paul’s traveling companion and interpreter of Peter in 66-70 CE, a time when the Jewish people were revolting against Rome. The gospel is believed to have been composed in Rome, Syria or Palestine and addressed Christian Gentiles. Many modern scholars however regard gospel of Mark authorship as anonymous because John Mark didn’t identify himself clearly in the text. Death of Jesus and the theme of destruction of the temple suggest that the composition of gospel of Mark happened when the Jewish revolt against Rome had already begun. The revolt happened immediately after the death of Jesus where Roman armies breached the wall of Jerusalem, destroyed the holy city and Temple of Jerusalem (Gospel of Mark, 2004).

The Son of Man Concept

The concept of “son of man” is assigned by mark in three different categories. These categories are; the earthly son of man, the suffering son of man and the eschatology son of man. The concept of son of man refers to Jesus, his life on earth,
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One of the major gospel themes in Luke is the gospel of great pardons. In Luke 7:36-50, a story is told of a sinful woman who anointed the feet of Jesus. The woman was pardoned despite her many sins. The theme is also depicted in other stories in the gospel such as the story of the lost sheep, the coin and the story of the prodigal son who was pardoned by his father despite his sins. Furthermore, a story is told of a man called Zacchaeus, a tax collector who stole people’s belonging was pardoned by Jesus (Mcnamara, 2016).

The gospel of the poor is another major theme in the gospel of Luke that is well illustrated than any other synoptic gospels. Luke warns of the dangers of riches and how it is hard for rich people to enter the kingdom of God. This is supported by the story of Lazarus and the rich

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